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Dustin Kirkland: Deploy OpenStack IceHouse like a Boss!

Planet UBUNTU - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 11:54md

This little snippet of ~200 lines of YAML is the exact OpenStack that I'm deploying tonight, at the OpenStack Austin Meetup.

Anyone with a working Juju and MAAS setup, and 7 registered servers should be able to deploy this same OpenStack setup, in about 12 minutes, with a single command.


$ wget http://people.canonical.com/~kirkland/icehouseOB.yaml
$ juju-deployer -c icehouseOB.yaml
$ cat icehouseOB.yaml

icehouse:
overrides:
openstack-origin: "cloud:trusty-icehouse"
source: "distro"
services:
ceph:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceph-27"
num_units: 3
constraints: tags=physical
options:
fsid: "9e7aac42-4bf4-11e3-b4b7-5254006a039c"
"monitor-secret": AQAAvoJSOAv/NRAAgvXP8d7iXN7lWYbvDZzm2Q==
"osd-devices": "/srv"
"osd-reformat": "yes"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2648.6688842773438"
"gui-y": "708.3873901367188"
keystone:
charm: "cs:trusty/keystone-5"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"admin-password": "admin"
"admin-token": "admin"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2013.905517578125"
"gui-y": "75.58013916015625"
"nova-compute":
charm: "cs:trusty/nova-compute-3"
num_units: 3
constraints: tags=physical
to: [ceph=0, ceph=1, ceph=2]
options:
"flat-interface": eth0
annotations:
"gui-x": "776.1040649414062"
"gui-y": "-81.22811031341553"
"neutron-gateway":
charm: "cs:trusty/quantum-gateway-3"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=virtual
options:
ext-port: eth1
instance-mtu: 1400
annotations:
"gui-x": "329.0572509765625"
"gui-y": "46.4658203125"
"nova-cloud-controller":
charm: "cs:trusty/nova-cloud-controller-41"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"network-manager": Neutron
annotations:
"gui-x": "1388.40185546875"
"gui-y": "-118.01156234741211"
rabbitmq:
charm: "cs:trusty/rabbitmq-server-4"
num_units: 1
to: mysql
annotations:
"gui-x": "633.8120727539062"
"gui-y": "862.6530151367188"
glance:
charm: "cs:trusty/glance-3"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
annotations:
"gui-x": "1147.3269653320312"
"gui-y": "1389.5643157958984"
cinder:
charm: "cs:trusty/cinder-4"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
options:
"block-device": none
annotations:
"gui-x": "1752.32568359375"
"gui-y": "1365.716194152832"
"ceph-radosgw":
charm: "cs:trusty/ceph-radosgw-3"
num_units: 1
to: nova-cloud-controller
annotations:
"gui-x": "2216.68212890625"
"gui-y": "697.16796875"
cinder-ceph:
charm: "cs:trusty/cinder-ceph-1"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "2257.5515747070312"
"gui-y": "1231.2130126953125"
"openstack-dashboard":
charm: "cs:trusty/openstack-dashboard-4"
num_units: 1
to: "keystone"
options:
webroot: "/"
annotations:
"gui-x": "2353.6898193359375"
"gui-y": "-94.2642593383789"
mysql:
charm: "cs:trusty/mysql-1"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
options:
"dataset-size": "20%"
annotations:
"gui-x": "364.4567565917969"
"gui-y": "1067.5167846679688"
mongodb:
charm: "cs:trusty/mongodb-0"
num_units: 1
constraints: tags=physical
annotations:
"gui-x": "-70.0399979352951"
"gui-y": "1282.8224487304688"
ceilometer:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceilometer-0"
num_units: 1
to: mongodb
annotations:
"gui-x": "-78.13333225250244"
"gui-y": "919.3128051757812"
ceilometer-agent:
charm: "cs:trusty/ceilometer-agent-0"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "-90.9158582687378"
"gui-y": "562.5347595214844"
heat:
charm: "cs:trusty/heat-0"
num_units: 1
to: mongodb
annotations:
"gui-x": "494.94012451171875"
"gui-y": "1363.6024169921875"
ntp:
charm: "cs:trusty/ntp-4"
num_units: 0
annotations:
"gui-x": "-104.57728099822998"
"gui-y": "294.6641273498535"
relations:
- - "keystone:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:image-service"
- "glance:image-service"
- - "nova-cloud-controller:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "glance:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "glance:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "cinder:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "cinder:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "cinder:cinder-volume-service"
- "nova-cloud-controller:cinder-volume-service"
- - "cinder:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "neutron-gateway:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "neutron-gateway:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "neutron-gateway:quantum-network-service"
- "nova-cloud-controller:quantum-network-service"
- - "openstack-dashboard:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "nova-compute:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "nova-compute:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "nova-compute:image-service"
- "glance:image-service"
- - "nova-compute:cloud-compute"
- "nova-cloud-controller:cloud-compute"
- - "cinder:storage-backend"
- "cinder-ceph:storage-backend"
- - "ceph:client"
- "cinder-ceph:ceph"
- - "ceph:client"
- "nova-compute:ceph"
- - "ceph:client"
- "glance:ceph"
- - "ceilometer:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "ceilometer:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "ceilometer:shared-db"
- "mongodb:database"
- - "ceilometer-agent:container"
- "nova-compute:juju-info"
- - "ceilometer-agent:ceilometer-service"
- "ceilometer:ceilometer-service"
- - "heat:shared-db"
- "mysql:shared-db"
- - "heat:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "heat:amqp"
- "rabbitmq:amqp"
- - "ceph-radosgw:mon"
- "ceph:radosgw"
- - "ceph-radosgw:identity-service"
- "keystone:identity-service"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "neutron-gateway:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceph:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "keystone:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "nova-compute:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "nova-cloud-controller:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "rabbitmq:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "glance:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "cinder:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceph-radosgw:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "openstack-dashboard:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "mysql:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "mongodb:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "ceilometer:juju-info"
- - "ntp:juju-info"
- "heat:juju-info"
series: trusty

:-Dustin

California Tells Businesses: Stop Trying To Ban Consumer Reviews

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 11:45md
ericgoldman writes Some businesses are so paranoid about negative consumer reviews that they have contractually banned their customers from writing reviews or imposed fines on consumers who bash them. California has told businesses to stop it. AB 2365--signed by Governor Brown yesterday, and the first law of its kind in the nation--says any contract provisions restricting consumer reviews are void, and simply including an anti-review clause in the contract can trigger penalties of $2,500.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Learning About Enea's Real Time Linux Embedded OS (Video)

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 11:02md
Jon Aldama is the Product Marketing Manager for Enea A.B., but he prides himself on being a developer first and a marketer second -- a point he stresses early in today's video. Enea is behind Operating System Embedded, whose Wikipedia page, some say, "appears to be written like an advertisement," which an unkind person could also say about the Enea A.B. Wikipedia page. In any case, Enea works with the Linux Foundation's Yocto Project workgroup, whose main webpage says, "It's not an embedded Linux distribution – it creates a custom one for you." This is all open source, which Jon says is a big corporate principle at Enea -- and he should know, since his previous job was as an Open Source Compliance Officer and Software Analyst at Ericsson. (Alternate Video Link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Rosetta Hunts For Comet Touch Down Site For Philae Lander

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 10:20md
astroengine writes Attached to the European Space Agency's comet-chasing spacecraft Rosetta, the Philae lander opened one of its robotic eyes when the mission was orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko at a distance of only 50 kilometers (31 miles) on Sunday. With two high-contrast exposures, the lander captured one of Rosetta's solar panels in the foreground with the comet behind. ESA says the choice of landing sites will be narrowed down from five to two on Monday -- a primary target and a backup -- before a final decision is made in October.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Lucas Nussbaum: Will the packages you rely on be part of Debian Jessie?

Planet Debian - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 9:28md

The start of the jessie freeze is quickly approaching, so now is a good time to ensure that packages you rely on will the part of the upcoming release. Thanks to automated removals, the number of release critical bugs has been kept low, but this was achieved by removing many packages from jessie: 841 packages from unstable are not part of jessie, and won’t be part of the release if things don’t change.

It is actually simple to check if you have packages installed locally that are part of those 841 packages:

  1. apt-get install how-can-i-help (available in backports if you don’t use testing or unstable)
  2. how-can-i-help --old
  3. Look at packages listed under Packages removed from Debian ‘testing’ and Packages going to be removed from Debian ‘testing’

Then, please fix all the bugs :-) Seriously, not all RC bugs are hard to fix. A good starting point to understand why a package is not part of jessie is tracker.d.o.

On my laptop, the two packages that are not part of jessie are the geeqie image viewer (which looks likely to be fixed in time), and josm, the OpenStreetMap editor, due to three RC bugs. It seems much harder to fix… If you fix it in time for jessie, I’ll offer you a $drink!

Lucas Nussbaum: Will the packages you rely on be part of Debian Jessie?

Planet UBUNTU - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 9:28md

The start of the jessie freeze is quickly approaching, so now is a good time to ensure that packages you rely on will the part of the upcoming release. Thanks to automated removals, the number of release critical bugs has been kept low, but this was achieved by removing many packages from jessie: 841 packages from unstable are not part of jessie, and won’t be part of the release if things don’t change.

It is actually simple to check if you have packages installed locally that are part of those 841 packages:

  1. apt-get install how-can-i-help (available in backports if you don’t use testing or unstable)
  2. how-can-i-help --old
  3. Look at packages listed under Packages removed from Debian ‘testing’ and Packages going to be removed from Debian ‘testing’

Then, please fix all the bugs :-) Seriously, not all RC bugs are hard to fix. A good starting point to understand why a package is not part of jessie is tracker.d.o.

On my laptop, the two packages that are not part of jessie are the geeqie image viewer (which looks likely to be fixed in time), and josm, the OpenStreetMap editor, due to three RC bugs. It seems much harder to fix… If you fix it in time for jessie, I’ll offer you a $drink!

Google Hangouts Gets Google Voice Integration And Free VoIP Calls

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 9:26md
sfcrazy writes Google will integrate Voice and Hangouts with the launch of its redesigned Hangouts apps for Android and iOS, as well as on the web. Amit Fulay, Product Manager at Google says, "Starting today you can make voice calls from Hangouts on Android, iOS and the web. It's free to call other Hangouts users, it's free to call numbers in the U.S. and Canada, and the international rates are really low. So keeping in touch is easier and more affordable than ever."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








First Intel 14nm Broadwell Core M Benchmarks Unveiled

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 9:03md
MojoKid writes Intel Execs out at IDF this week in San Francisco have let slip some actual benchmark run results on Intel's just-released Broadwell Core M processor platform. Intel has gone into detail on Broadwell's architecture and features previously and has discussed power consumption and performance expectations. However, now we finally have some cold, hard numbers, rather than just percentage comparisons versus previous generation Intel platforms. Intel was demonstrating a 12.5-inch Broadwell-based, Core M 5Y70-powered Windows tablet live and the benchmark runs look promising, with 3DMark scores in the 50K range. The Cinebench results shown place the CPU on par with full-fledged Core i5 notebook variants in the 15 Watt power envelope, but powered by the new 4.5 Watt Broadwell Y Core M processor that will be employed mostly in 2-in-1 hybrid devices and high end tablets.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








The Grassroots Future of Biohacking

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 8:43md
An anonymous reader writes Forget about some kid engineering a virulent microbe in their bedroom. As the assistant director of the Maurice Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering, Oliver Medvedik, puts it, "It's extremely difficult to 'improve' on the lethality of nature. The pathogens that already exist are more legitimate cause for worry.” If anything, you're better off putting energy into wrenching away your desire for McDonalds, and making sure the government doesn't impose draconian laws about DIY-bio. Here's a look at the grassroots future of biohacking and the problems with government overreach.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








5 Million Gmail Passwords Leaked, Google Says No Evidence Of Compromise

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 7:55md
kierny writes After first appearing on multiple Russian cybercrime boards, a list of 5 million Google account usernames — which of course double as email usernames — are circulating via file-sharing sites. Experts say the information most likely didn't result from a hack of any given site, including Google, but was rather amassed over time, likely via a number of hacks of smaller sites, as well as via malware infections. Numerous commenters who have found their email addresses included in the list of exposed credentials say the included password appears to date from at least three years ago, if not longer. That means anyone who's changed their Google/Gmail password in the last three years is likely safe from account takeover.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








When Scientists Give Up

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 7:13md
New submitter ferespo sends a report from All Things Considered about the struggle for scientific funding in today's political and economic environment. "Federal funding for biomedical research has declined by more than 20 percent in the past decade. There are far more scientists competing for grants than there is money to support them." It's a tough situation for new scientists trying to set up labs. In addition to all of the scientific work they do, it's essentially a full-time job in addition to that to maintain funding. The reviewers who decide which projects receive funding are risk-averse to the point where innovative research is all but off the table. The consequences of this are two-fold: not only are we giving up on the types of research that led to so many of today's marvels, but many promising young scientists are giving up on the field altogether.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








SpaceX and Boeing Battle For US Manned Spaceflight Contracts

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 6:31md
An anonymous reader writes: $3 billion in funding is on the line as private space companies duke it out for contracts to end U.S. reliance on Russian rockets for manned spaceflight. The two biggest contenders are SpaceX and Boeing, described as "the exciting choice" and "the safe choice," respectively. "NASA is charting a new direction 45 years after sending humans to the Moon, looking to private industry for missions near Earth, such as commuting to and from the space station. Commercial operators would develop space tourism while the space agency focuses on distant trips to Mars or asteroids." It's possible the contracts would be split, giving some tasks to each company. It's also possible that the much smaller Sierra Nevada Corp. could grab a bit of government funding as well for launches using its unique winged-shuttle design.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 5:49md
An anonymous reader writes: It's official: the smartwatch wars have begun. Apple's announcement of the Apple Watch added a contender to the race already shaping up between the Pebble watch, the Moto 360, and others. Personally, my doubts about wanting one were put to rest when I learned of the health-related features. Smartwatches will be able to track your movements and pulse rate, calculate how many calories you burn, and coach you continuously to improve your fitness. If you have one or plan on buying one, what apps or functions do you see yourself getting the most use from? If you're still skeptical, what would it take? (If an app developer sees your requirements here on Slashdot, your wish might come true.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Using Wearable Tech To Track Gun Use

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 5:06md
An anonymous reader writes: A debate has been raging recently over whether or not to equip police with body cameras so that instances of violence in the line of duty can be monitored. It's an important discussion to have, but we should also look at other technologies that could help provide hard data on gun incidents. A new paper was recently published in PLOS ONE about the use of wristband accelerometers to detect when the wearer has fired a gun. Study author and criminology professor Charles Loeffler said, "A gunshot is pretty distinctive. You're typically at rest because you're trying to aim, and in a split second, your hand, wrist, and arm experience an impulsive transfer of energy." Loeffler suggests a suite of sensors including GPS and the wristband accelerometer could be given to convicts as a requirement for their parole. Not only would this help with police response in case of recidivism, but it could provide additional deterrent to further crimes. It could also be helpful to police departments, both for accountability and for integration between the police and the courts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Information Theory Places New Limits On Origin of Life

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 4:24md
KentuckyFC writes: Most research into the origin of life focuses on the messy business of chemistry, on the nature of self-replicating molecules and on the behavior of autocatalytic reactions. Now one theorist says the properties of information also place important limits on how life must have evolved, without getting bogged down in the biochemical details. The new approach uses information theory to highlight a key property that distinguishes living from non-living systems: their ability to store information and replicate it almost indefinitely. A measure of this how much these systems differ from a state of maximum entropy or thermodynamic equilibrium. The new approach is to create a mathematical model of these informational differences and use it to make predictions about how likely it is to find self-replicating molecules in an artificial life system called Avida. And interestingly, the predictions closely match what researchers have found in practice. The bottom line is that according to information theory, environments favorable to life are unlikely to be unusual.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Didier Roche: How to help on Ubuntu Developer Tools Center

Planet UBUNTU - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 4:16md

Last week, we announced our "Ubuntu Loves Developers" effort! We got some great feedback and coverage. Multiple questions arose around how to help and be part of this effort. Here is the post to answer about this

Our philosophy

First, let's define the core principles around the Ubuntu Developer Tools Center and what we are trying to achieve with this:

  1. UDTC will always download, tests and support the latest available upstream developer stack. No version stuck in stone for 5 years, we get the latest and the best release that upstream delivers to all of us. We are conscious that being able to develop on a freshly updated environment is one of the core values of the developer audience and that's why we want to deliver that experience.
  2. We know that developers want stability overall and not have to upgrade or spend time maintaining their machine every 6 months. We agree they shouldn't have to and the platform should "get out of my way, I've got work to do". That's the reason why we focus heavily on the latest LTS release of Ubuntu. All tools will always be backported and supported on the latest Long Term Support release. Tests are running multiple times a day on this platform. In addition to this, we support, of course, the latest available Ubuntu Release for developers who likes to live on the edge!
  3. We want to ensure that the supported developer environment is always functional. Indeed, by always downloading latest version from upstream, the software stack can change its requirements, requiring newer or extra libraries and thus break. That's why we are running a whole suite of functional tests multiple times a day, on both version that you can find in distro and latest trunk. That way we know if:
  • we broke ourself in trunk and needs to fix it before releasing.
  • the platform broke one of the developer stack and we can promptly fix it.
  • a third-party application or a website changed and broke the integration. We can then fix this really early on.

All those tests running will ensure the best experience we can deliver, while fetching always latest released version from upstream, and all this, on a very stable platform!

Sounds cool, how can I help? Reports bugs and propose enhancements

The more direct way of reporting a bug or giving any suggestions is through the upstream bug tracker. Of course, you can always reach us out as well on social networks like g+, through the comments section of this blog, or on IRC: #ubuntu-desktop, on freenode. We are also starting to look at the #ubuntulovesdevs hashtag.

The tool is really to help developers, so do not hesitate to help us directing the Ubuntu Developer Tools Center on the way which is the best for you.

Help translating

We already had some good translations contributions through launchpad! Thanks to all our translators, we got Basque, Chinese (Hong Kong), Chinese (Simplified), French, Italian and Spanish! There are only few strings up for translations in udtc and it should take less than half an hour in total to add a new one. It's a very good and useful way to contribute for people speaking other languages than English! We do look at them and merge them in the mainline automatically.

Contribute on the code itself

Some people started to offer code contribution and that's a very good and motivating news. Do not hesitate to fork us on the upstream github repo. We'll ensure we keep up to date on all code contributions and pull requests. If you have any questions or for better coordination, open a bug to start the discussion around your awesome idea. We'll try to be around and guide you on how to add any framework support! You will not be alone!

Write some documentation

We have some basic user documentation. If you feel there are any gaps or any missing news, feel free to edit the wiki page! You can as well merge some of the documentation of the README.md file or propose some enhancements to it!

To give an easy start to any developers who wants to hack on udtc iitself, we try to keep the README.md file readable and up to the current code content. However, this one can deviate a little bit, if you think that any part missing/explanation requires, you can propose any modifications to it to help future hackers having an easier start.

Spread the word!

Finally, spreading the word that Ubuntu Loves Developers and we mean it! Talk about it on social network, tagging with #ubuntulovesdevs or in blog posts, or just chatting to your local community! We deeply care about our developer audience on the Ubuntu Desktop and Server and we want this to be known!

For more information and hopefully goodness, we'll have an ubuntu on air session session soon! We'll keep you posted on this blog when we have final dates details.

If you felt that I forgot to mention anything, do not hesitate to signal it as well, this is another form of very welcome contributions!

I'll discuss next week how we maintain and runs tests to ensure your developer tools are always working and supported!

Reanalysis of Clinical Trials Finds Misleading Results

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 3:37md
sciencehabit writes: Clinical trials rarely get a second look — and when they do, their findings are not always what the authors originally reported. That's the conclusion of a new study (abstract), which compared how 37 studies that had been reanalyzed measured up to the original. In 13 cases, the reanalysis came to a different outcome — a finding that suggests many clinical trials may not be accurately reporting the effect of a new drug or intervention. Moreover, only five of the reanalyses were by an entirely different set of authors, which means they did not get a neutral relook. In one of the trials, which examined the efficacy of the drug methotrexate in treating systemic sclerosis—an autoimmune disease that causes scarring of the skin and internal organs—the original researchers found the drug to be not much more effective than the placebo, as they reported in a 2001 paper. However, in a 2009 reanalysis of the same trial, another group of researchers including one of the original authors used Bayesian analysis, a statistical technique to overcome the shortcomings of small data sets that plague clinical trials of rare diseases such as sclerosis. The reanalysis found that the drug was, as it turned out, more effective than the placebo and had a good chance of benefiting sclerosis patients.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Text While Driving In Long Island and Have Your Phone Disabled

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 2:55md
An anonymous reader writes: A District Attorney in Long Island, NY is stepping up efforts to combat distracted driving. Kathleen Rice says motorists who are caught texting while driving should have hardware or apps installed on their phone to prevent them from using it at all while driving. She likened such barriers to the ignition interlock devices that prevent people convicted of drunk driving from using their cars unless they're sober. "Hardware and software solutions that block texting during driving are currently produced by various manufacturers and software developers, and are constantly under development. The DA's office does not endorse any particular company and is in the process of reviewing specific solutions based on their features and services. Critical features include security measures to make the solutions tamper-proof, and data integrity measures to ensure accurate reporting to courts, law enforcement, parents, and guardians." New York is one of many states who already have laws banning all handheld use while driving.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Microsoft Agrees To Contempt Order So It Can Appeal Email Privacy Case

Slashdot.org - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 2:12md
An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft made news some weeks ago for refusing to hand over customer emails stored on its Dublin, Ireland servers to the U.S. government. The district judge presiding over the case agreed with the government and ordered Microsoft to comply with its demands. On Monday, Microsoft struck a deal with the U.S. government in which the company would be held on contempt charges but would not be penalized for it until after the outcome of an appeal. The district judge endorsed the agreement (PDF) on Thursday.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s first report about Debian Long Term Support

Planet Debian - Mër, 10/09/2014 - 1:30md

When we setup Freexian’s offer to bring together funding from multiple companies in order to sponsor the work of multiple developers on Debian LTS, one of the rules that I imposed is that all paid contributors must provide a public monthly report of their paid work.

While the LTS project officially started in June, the first month where contributors were actually paid has been July. Freexian sponsored Thorsten Alteholz and Holger Levsen for 10.5 hours each in July and for 16.5 hours each in August. Here are their reports:

It’s worth noting that Freexian sponsored Holger’s work to fix the security tracker to support squeeze-lts. It’s my belief that using the money of our sponsors to make it easier for everybody to contribute to Debian LTS is money well spent.

As evidenced by the progress bar on Freexian’s offer page, we have not yet reached our minimal goal of funding the equivalent of a half-time position. And it shows in the results, the dla-needed.txt still shows around 30 open issues. This is slightly better than the state two months ago but we can improve a lot on the average time to push out a security update…

To have an idea of the relative importance of the contributions of the paid developers, I counted the number of uploads made by Thorsten and Holger since July: of 40 updates, they took care of 19 of them, so about the half.

I also looked at the other contributors: Raphaël Geissert stands out with 9 updates (I believe that he is contracted by Électricité de France for doing this) and most of the other contributors look like regular Debian maintainers taking care of their own packages (Paul Gevers with cacti, Christoph Berg with postgresql, Peter Palfrader with tor, Didier Raboud with cups, Kurt Roeckx with openssl, Balint Reczey with wireshark) except Matt Palmer and Luciano Bello who (likely) are benevolent members of the LTS team.

There are multiple things to learn here:

  1. Paid contributors already handle almost 70% of the updates. Counting only on volunteers would not have worked.
  2. Quite a few companies that promised help (and got mentioned in the press release) have not delivered the promised help yet (neither through Freexian nor directly).

Last but not least, this project wouldn’t exist without the support of multiple companies and organizations. Many thanks to them:

Hopefully this list will expand over time! Any help to reach out to new companies and organizations is more than welcome.

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