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Apple To Donate Profit Portion From Black Friday For AIDS Fight

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 3:30md
An anonymous reader writes Apple will donate a portion of their sales from online and retail stores on Cyber Monday and Black Friday as a contribution to the worldwide fight against AIDS. Apple kicks off a two-week fundraising campaign for RED, the charity started by U2 lead singer Bono and Bobby Shriver. It includes 25 partnering app-makers, from Angry Birds to Toca Boca, which will donate all proceeds from purchases of their apps or in-app upgrades. In a statement, Apple CEO Tim Cook said: "Apple is a proud supporter of (RED) because we believe the gift of life is the most important gift anyone can give. For eight years, our customers have been helping fight AIDS in Africa by funding life-saving treatments which are having a profoundly positive impact. This year we are launching our biggest fundraising push yet with the participation of Apple's retail and online stores, and some of the brightest minds in the App Store are lending their talents to the effort as well."

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Multi-National Crew Reaches Space Station

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 3:07md
An anonymous reader writes A Russian capsule carrying three astronauts from Russia, the United States and Italy has blasted off for the International Space Station. Aboard the capsule are Russian Anton Shkaplerov, Nasa's Terry Virts and European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, Italy's first female astronaut. "I think that 100 years from now, 500 years from now, people will look back on this as the initial baby steps that we took going into the solar system," Virts told a pre-launch press conference. "In the same way that we look back on Columbus and the other explorers 500 years ago, this is the way people will look at this time in history."

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Multiple Manufacturers Push Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars, But Can They Catch Tesla?

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 2:47md
MojoKid writes After years of working on prototype vehicles, multiple car companies have announced a major push for hydrogen fuel cell automobiles. At the LA Auto Show last week, Toyota showed off its Mirai, a four-door passenger sedan with a $57,500 base sticker price and a hydrogen-only fuel system. Honda recently delayed its hydrogen-powered FCX Clarity Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle until 2016, while Hyundai is planning to build 1000 fuel-cell powered Tucson's by the end of the year. Currently, most proposed hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are actually combined hydrogen-electric designs. Hydrogen gas, under enormous pressure, is used to drive a generator, which then charges a lithium-ion battery. Toyota plans to sell up to 3,000 Mirai a year by 2017, which would put it well below Tesla's own sales projections for its Model S — but at a lower overall price point. The pressurized fuel tanks in the Mirai can hold a total of 122 liters of hydrogen for an estimated range of 300 miles. A standard gasoline-powered car with a 122L capacity at 30mpg would be capable of traveling 960 miles. Proponents of hydrogen point to the vastly improved fueling time (roughly equal that of gasoline) as opposed to the 20-60 minutes required to recharge a vehicle like Tesla's Model S.

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Cops 101: NYC High School Teaches How To Behave During Stop-and-Frisk

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 2:05md
HughPickens.com writes Kate Briquelet reports in the NY Post that Principal Mark Federman of East Side Community HS has invited the New York Civil Liberties Union to give a two-day training session to 450 students on interacting with police. "We're not going to candy-coat things — we have a problem in our city that's affecting young men of color and all of our students," says Federman. "It's not about the police being bad. This isn't anti-police as much as it's pro-young people ... It's about what to do when kids are put in a position where they feel powerless and uncomfortable." The hourlong workshops — held in small classroom sessions during advisory periods — focused on the NYPD's stop-and-frisk program and how to exercise Fourth Amendment rights when being stopped and questioned in a car or at home. Some law-enforcement experts say the NYCLU is going beyond civics lessons and doling out criminal-defense advice. "It's unlikely that a high school student would come away with any other conclusion than the police are a fearful group to be avoided at all costs," says Eugene O'Donnell, a former police officer and professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. NYCLU representatives told kids to be polite and to keep their hands out of their pockets. But they also told students they don't have to show ID or consent to searches, that it's best to remain silent, and how to file a complaint against an officer. Candis Tolliver, NYCLU's associate director for advocacy, says was the first time she trained an entire high school. "This is not about teaching kids how to get away with a crime or being disrespectful. This is about making sure both sides are walking away from the situation safe and in control."

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Daniel G. Siegel: summing up 65

Planet GNOME - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 11:20pd

i am trying to build a jigsaw puzzle which has no lid and is missing half of the pieces. i am unable to show you what it will be, but i can show you some of the pieces and why they matter to me. if you are building a different puzzle, it is possible that these pieces won't mean much to you, maybe they won't fit or they won't fit yet. then again, these might just be the pieces you're looking for. this is summing up, please find previous editions here.

  • rage against the machines, in many ways, we are our greatest technological constraint. the slow and steady march of human evolution has fallen out of step with technological progress: evolution occurs on millennial time scales, whereas processing power doubles roughly every other year. our ancestors who lived in caves would have found it advantageous to have very strong, perhaps almost hyperactive pattern-recognition skills - to be able to identify in a split-second whether that rustling in the leaves over yonder was caused by the wind or by an encroaching grizzly bear. nowadays, in a fast-paced world awash in numbers and statistics, those same tendencies can get us into trouble: when presented with a series of random numbers, we see patterns where there aren't any. we have to view technology as what it always has been - a tool for the betterment of the human condition. we should neither worship at the altar of technology nor be frightened by it. nobody has yet designed, and perhaps no one ever will, a computer that thinks like a human being. but computers are themselves a reflection of human progress and human ingenuity: it is not really "artificial" intelligence if a human designed the artifice. highly recommended
  • the sixth stage of grief is retro-computing, technology is what we share. i don't mean "we share the experience of technology." i mean: by my lights, people very often share technologies with each other when they talk. strategies. ideas for living our lives. we do it all the time. parenting email lists share strategies about breastfeeding and bedtime. quotes from the dalai lama. we talk neckties, etiquette, and minecraft, and tell stories that give us guidance as to how to live. a tremendous part of daily life regards the exchange of technologies. we are good at it. it's so simple as to be invisible. can i borrow your scissors? do you want tickets? i know guacamole is extra. the world of technology isn't separate from regular life. it's made to seem that way because of, well... capitalism. tribal dynamics. territoriality. because there is a need to sell technology, to package it, to recoup the terrible investment. so it becomes this thing that is separate from culture. a product. highly recommended
  • worse is better is worse, the real quarrel with the paper i have is about what it teaches people. it warps the minds of youth. it is never a good idea to intentionally aim for anything less than the best, though one might have to compromise in order to succeed. maybe richard means one should aim high but make sure you shoot - sadly he didn't say that. he said "worse is better," and though it might be an attractive, mind-grabbing headline seducing people into reading his paper, it teaches the wrong lesson - a lesson he may not intend, or a lesson poorly stated. i know he can say the right thing, and i wish he had (pdf)
  • airport codes: a history and explanation of airport abcs

Bidding In Government Auction of Airwaves Reaches $34 Billion

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 11:05pd
An anonymous reader sends word that the 2014 wireless spectrum license auction has surpassed $34 billion. "A government auction of airwaves for use in mobile broadband has blown through presale estimates, becoming the biggest auction in the Federal Communications Commission's history and signaling that wireless companies expect demand for Internet access by smartphones to continue to soar. And it's not over yet. Companies bid more than $34 billion as of Friday afternoon for six blocks of airwaves, totaling 65 megahertz of the electromagnetic spectrum, being sold by the F.C.C. That total is more than three times the $10.5 billion reserve price that the commission put on the sale, the first offering of previously unavailable airwaves in six years."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Finally, a New Clue to Solve the CIA's Mysterious Kryptos Sculpture

LinuxSecurity.com - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 10:07pd
LinuxSecurity.com: In 1989, the year the Berlin Wall began to fall, American artist Jim Sanborn was busy working on his Kryptos sculpture, a cryptographic puzzle wrapped in a riddle that he created for the CIA's headquarters and that has been driving amateur and professional cryptographers mad ever since.

Attackers Using Compromised Web Plug-Ins in CryptoPHP Blackhat SEO Campaign

LinuxSecurity.com - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 10:04pd
LinuxSecurity.com: Researchers have discovered a group of attackers who have published a variety of compromised WordPress themes and plug-ins on legitimate-looking sites, tricking developers into downloading and installing them on their own sites. The components then give the attackers remote control of the compromised sites and researchers say the attack may have been ongoing since September 2013.

How to weed out the next Heartbleed bug: ENISA details crypto worries

LinuxSecurity.com - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 9:59pd
LinuxSecurity.com: The cryptographic protocols used to secure data moving across the web are putting users at risk due to design flaws that date back many years. Given the current push to encrypt everything in response to revelations of government surveillance, it's important that the protocols being used to do the job are actually secure.

Study: Space Rock Impacts Not Random

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 8:05pd
sciencehabit writes When it comes to small space rocks blowing up in Earth's atmosphere, not all days are created equal. Scientists have found that, contrary to what they thought, such events are not random, and these explosions may occur more frequently on certain days. Rather than random occurrences, many large airbursts might result from collisions between Earth and streams of debris associated with small asteroids or comets. The new findings may help astronomers narrow their search for objects in orbits that threaten Earth, the researchers suggest.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Matthias Clasen: GTK+ Inspector update

Planet GNOME - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 5:22pd

GTK+ Inspector is a debugging tool that is built directly into GTK+ and is available in every GTK+ application by using of the shortcuts Ctrl-Shift-d or Ctrl-Shift-i.

Since I last wrote about it, a number of things have changed, so it is time to give an update on the state of GtkInspector as of GTK+ 3.15.2.

The UI has been revamped a bit to make best use of the limited space in the inspector window.  Some of our newer widgets, such as GtkStackSwitcher, GtkSidebar and GtkSearchEntry, were helpful here:

The object list has a new search implementation. It tries to deal better with search in a tree than the built-in search in GtkTreeView. Please try it and let me know what you think.

We’ve added a new feature: object statistics. This is made possible by corresponding new functionality in GLib. To enable it, run your application with

GOBJECT_DEBUG=instance-count

The inspector is now using a separate display connection.  This isolates it from many of the changes that you can make in it, such as CSS tweaks:

After 3.14, we have started to integrate OpenGL rendering into GTK+.  This is reflected in the inspector, which shows information about the OpenGL stack and offers some GL-related debug settings:

More recently, I’ve spent my coding time helping to make glade support all of the new GTK+ widgets and features.  We are not quite there yet, but you can already use client-side decorations, GtkHeaderBar, GtkSearchBar, GtkStack, GtkStackSwitcher and GtkSidebar with glade from git master.

I hope to add a few more new widgets to this list soon.  My personal goal for this effort is to use glade for all the ui files inside GTK+.

How the World's Agricultural Boom Has Changed CO2 Cycles

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 5:09pd
An anonymous reader writes Every year levels of carbon dioxide drop in the summer as plants "inhale," and climb again as they exhale after the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the last 50 years has seen the size of this swing has increase by as 50%, for reasons that aren't fully understood. A team of researchers may have the answer. They have shown that agricultural production, corn in particular, may generate up to 25% of the increase in this seasonal carbon cycle. "This study shows the power of modeling and data mining in addressing potential sources contributing to seasonal changes in carbon dioxide" program director for the National Science Foundation's Macro Systems Biology Program, who supported the research, Liz Blood says. "It points to the role of basic research in finding answers to complex problems."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








John Goerzen: My boys love 1986 computing

Planet Debian - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 4:27pd

Yesterday, Jacob (age 8) asked to help me put together a 30-year-old computer from parts in my basement. Meanwhile, Oliver (age 5) asked Laura to help him learn cursive. Somehow, this doesn’t seem odd for a Saturday at our place.

Let me tell you how this came about.

I’ve had a project going on for a while now to load data from old floppies. It’s been fun, and had a surprise twist the other day: my parents gave me an old TRS-80 Color Computer II (aka “CoCo 2″). It was, in fact, my first computer, one they got for me when I was in Kindergarten. It is nearly 30 years old.

I have been musing lately about the great disservice Apple did the world by making computers easy to learn — namely the fact that few people ever bother to learn about them. Who bothers to learn about them when, on the iPhone for instance, the case is sealed shut, the lifespan is 1 or 2 years for many purchasers, and the platform is closed in lots of ways?

I had forgotten how finicky computers used to be. But after some days struggling with IDE incompatibilities, booting issues, etc., when I actually managed to get data off a machine that had last booted in 1999, I had quite the sense of accomplishment, which I rarely have lately. I did something that was hard to do in a world where most of the interfaces don’t work with equipment that old (even if nominally they are supposed to.)

The CoCo is one of those computers normally used with a floppy drive or cassette recorder to store programs. You type DIR, and you feel the clack of the drive heads through the desk. You type CLOAD and you hear the relay click closed to turn on the tape motor. You wiggle cables around until they make contact just right. You power-cycle for the times when the reset button doesn’t quite do the job. The details of how it works aren’t abstracted away by innumerable layers of controllers, interfaces, operating system modules, etc. It’s all right there, literally vibrating your desk.

So I thought this could be a great opportunity for Jacob to learn a few more computing concepts, such as the difference between mass storage and RAM, plus a great way to encourage him to practice critical thinking. So we trekked down to the basement and came up with handfulls of parts. We brought up the computer, some joysticks, all sorts of tangled cables. We needed adapters, an old TV. Jacob helped me hook everything up, and then the moment of truth: success! A green BASIC screen!

I added more parts, but struck out when I tried to connect the floppy drive. The thing just wouldn’t start up right whenever the floppy controller cartridge was installed. I cleaned the cartridge. I took it apart, scrubbed the contacts, even did a re-seat of the chips. No dice.

So I fired up my CoCo emulator (xroar), and virtually “saved” some programs to cassette (a .wav file). I then burned those .wav files to an audio CD, brought up an old CD player from the basement, connected the “cassette in” plug to the CD player’s headphone jack, and presto — instant programs. (Well, almost. It takes a couple of minutes to load a program from audio codes.)

The picture above is Oliver cackling at one of the very simplest BASIC programs there is: “number find.” The computer picks a random number between 1 and 2000, and asks the user to guess it, giving a “too low” or “too high” clue with each incorrect guess. Oliver delighted in giving invalid input (way too high numbers, or things that weren’t numbers at all) and cackled at the sarcastic error messages built into the program. During Jacob’s turn, he got very serious about it, and is probably going to be learning about how to calculate halfway points before too long.

But imagine my pride when this morning, Jacob found the new CD I had made last night (correcting a couple recordings), found my one-line instruction on just part of how to load a program, and correctly figured out by himself all the steps to do in order (type CLOAD on the CoCo, advance the CD to the proper track, press play on the player, wait for it to load on the CoCo, then type RUN).

I ordered a replacement floppy controller off eBay tonight, and paid $5 for a coax adapter that should fix some video quality issues. I rescued some 5.25″ floppies from my trash can from another project, so they should have plenty of tools for exploration.

It is so much easier for them to learn how a disk drive works, and even what the heck a track is, when you can look at a floppy drive with the cover off and see the heads move. There are other things we can do with more modern equipment — Jacob has shown a lot of interest in Arduino projects — but I have so far drawn a blank on ways to really let kids discover how a modern PC (let alone a modern phone or tablet) works.

Alva Noe: Don't Worry About the Singularity, We Can't Even Copy an Amoeba

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 2:00pd
An anonymous reader writes "Writer and professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, Alva Noe, isn't worried that we will soon be under the rule of shiny metal overlords. He says that currently we can't produce "...machines that exhibit the agency and awareness of an amoeba." He writes at NPR: "One reason I'm not worried about the possibility that we will soon make machines that are smarter than us, is that we haven't managed to make machines until now that are smart at all. Artificial intelligence isn't synthetic intelligence: It's pseudo-intelligence. This really ought to be obvious. Clocks may keep time, but they don't know what time it is. And strictly speaking, it is we who use them to tell time. But the same is true of Watson, the IBM supercomputer that supposedly played Jeopardy! and dominated the human competition. Watson answered no questions. It participated in no competition. It didn't do anything. All the doing was on our side. We played Jeapordy! with Watson. We used 'it' the way we use clocks.""

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Stephen Michael Kellat: Our Tools: MORE POWER

Planet UBUNTU - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 1:00pd

Once the blog post by Jono Bacon hit about seeking a reboot in community governance, multiple threads bloomed in several directions. Things have wandered away from the original topic of governance structures to hit more vague, more general issues. To an extent I metaphorically keep biting my tongue about saying much more in the thread.

I do know that I have put forward the notion that we attempt an export to EPUB format of the xubuntu-docs package documentation. This, in part, is to help potentially ease a threshold for access. With the e-reader devices that do exist you could access the documentation on a separate device to read while you sit at the computer. This is only meant as an exploratory experimental notion rather than a commitment to ship.

In light of the feedback complaining about how DocBook can be difficult to address, sometimes it can be appropriate to test some of its power and show it off. DocBook has quite a lot of power to it if you have the ability to leverage it. With the variety of ways it can be exported into other formats than just the HTML files we already see shipped in Xubuntu, we can test new ways of shipping.

To the outsider, many of the processes used in creation of the various flavors of Ubuntu may seem like they can be simplified as they seem unnecessarily complicated. In some cases, we have excess power and flexibility built in for future expansion. In the times between Long Term Support releases we may need to take the time to show those who wish to join the community the power of our toolsets and what we can do with them.

NASA Remasters 20-Year-Old Galileo Photographs of Jupiter's Moon, Europa

Slashdot.org - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 12:46pd
An anonymous reader writes with news that NASA has released remastered pictures of Europa taken by the Galileo spacecraft. "Scientists have produced a new version of what is perhaps NASA's best view of Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. The mosaic of color images was obtained in the late 1990s by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. This is the first time that NASA is publishing a version of the scene produced using modern image processing techniques. This view of Europa stands out as the color view that shows the largest portion of the moon's surface at the highest resolution. An earlier, lower-resolution version of the view, published in 2001, featured colors that had been strongly enhanced. The new image more closely approximates what the human eye would see. Space imaging enthusiasts have produced their own versions of the view using the publicly available data, but NASA has not previously issued its own rendition using near-natural color."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








3.18-rc6: mainline

Kernel Linux - Hën, 24/11/2014 - 12:25pd
Version:3.18-rc6 (mainline) Released:2014-11-23 Source:linux-3.18-rc6.tar.xz PGP Signature:linux-3.18-rc6.tar.sign Patch:patch-3.18-rc6.xz
Kategoritë: Kernel Linux

2014 Hour of Code: Do Ends Justify Disney Product Placement Means?

Slashdot.org - Dje, 23/11/2014 - 11:29md
theodp writes "The purpose of product placement/product integration/branded entertainment," explains Disney in a job posting, "is to give a brand exposure outside of their traditional media buy." So, one imagines the folks in Disney Marketing must be thrilled that Disney Frozen princesses Anna and Elsa will be featured in the 'signature tutorial' for CSEdWeek's 2014 Hour of Code, which aims to introduce CS to 100 million schoolkids — including a sizable captive audience — in the weeks before Christmas. "Thanks to Disney Interactive," announced Code.org CEO Hadi Partovi, "Code.org's signature tutorial for the 2014 Hour of Code features Disney Infinity versions of Disney's 'Frozen' heroines Anna and Elsa!." Partovi adds, "The girl-power theme of the tutorial is a continuation of our efforts to expand diversity in computer science and broaden female participation in the field, starting with younger students." In the tutorial, reports the LA Times, "students will learn to write code to help Anna and Elsa draw snowflakes and snowmen, and perform magical 'ice craft.' Disney is also donating $100,000 to support Code.org's efforts to bring computer science education to after-school programs nationwide."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Dimitri John Ledkov: Analyzing public OpenPGP keys

Planet Debian - Dje, 23/11/2014 - 10:15md
OpenPGP Message Format (RFC 4880) well defines key structure and wire formats (openpgp packets). Thus when I looked for public key network (SKS) server setup, I quickly found pointers to dump files in said format for bootstrapping a key server.

I did not feel like experimenting with Python and instead opted for Go and found http://code.google.com/p/go.crypto/openpgp/packet library that has comprehensive support for parsing openpgp low level structures. I've downloaded the SKS dump, verified it's MD5SUM hashes (lolz), and went ahead to process them in Go.

With help from http://github.com/lib/pq and database/sql, I've written a small program to churn through all the dump files, filter for primary RSA keys (not subkeys) and inject them into a database table. The things that I have chosen to inject are fingerprint, N, E. N & E are the modulus of the RSA key pair and the public exponent. Together they form a public part of an RSA keypair. So far, nothing fancy.

Next I've run an SQL query to see how unique things are... and found 92 unique N & E pairs that have from two and up to fifteen duplicates. In total it is 231 unique fingerprints, which use key material with a known duplicate in the public key network. That didn't sound good. And also odd - given that over 940 000 other RSA keys managed to get unique enough entropy to pull out a unique key out of the keyspace haystack (which is humongously huge by the way).

Having the list of the keys, I've fetched them and they do not look like regular keys - their UIDs do not have names & emails, instead they look like something from the monkeysphere. The keys look like they are originally used for TLS and/or SSH authentication, but were converted into OpenPGP format and uploaded into the public key server. This reminded me of the Debian's SSL key generation vulnerability CVE-2008-0166. So these keys might have been generated with bad entropy due to affected tools by that CVE and later converted to OpenPGP.

Looking at the openssl-blacklist package, it should be relatively easy for me to generate all possible RSA key-pairs and I believe all other material that is hashed to generate the fingerprint are also available (RFC 4880#12.2). Thus it should be reasonably possible to generate matching private keys, generate revocation certificates and publish the revocation certificate with pointers to CVE-2008-0166. (Or email it to the people who have signed given monkeysphered keys). When I have a minute I will work on generating openpgp-blacklist type of scripts to address this.

If anyone is interested in the Go source code I've written to process openpgp packets, please drop me a line and I'll publish it on github or something.

Dimitri John Ledkov: Analyzing public OpenPGP keys

Planet UBUNTU - Dje, 23/11/2014 - 10:15md
OpenPGP Message Format (RFC 4880) well defines key structure and wire formats (openpgp packets). Thus when I looked for public key network (SKS) server setup, I quickly found pointers to dump files in said format for bootstrapping a key server.

I did not feel like experimenting with Python and instead opted for Go and found http://code.google.com/p/go.crypto/openpgp/packet library that has comprehensive support for parsing openpgp low level structures. I've downloaded the SKS dump, verified it's MD5SUM hashes (lolz), and went ahead to process them in Go.

With help from http://github.com/lib/pq and database/sql, I've written a small program to churn through all the dump files, filter for primary RSA keys (not subkeys) and inject them into a database table. The things that I have chosen to inject are fingerprint, N, E. N & E are the modulus of the RSA key pair and the public exponent. Together they form a public part of an RSA keypair. So far, nothing fancy.

Next I've run an SQL query to see how unique things are... and found 92 unique N & E pairs that have from two and up to fifteen duplicates. In total it is 231 unique fingerprints, which use key material with a known duplicate in the public key network. That didn't sound good. And also odd - given that over 940 000 other RSA keys managed to get unique enough entropy to pull out a unique key out of the keyspace haystack (which is humongously huge by the way).

Having the list of the keys, I've fetched them and they do not look like regular keys - their UIDs do not have names & emails, instead they look like something from the monkeysphere. The keys look like they are originally used for TLS and/or SSH authentication, but were converted into OpenPGP format and uploaded into the public key server. This reminded me of the Debian's SSL key generation vulnerability CVE-2008-0166. So these keys might have been generated with bad entropy due to affected tools by that CVE and later converted to OpenPGP.

Looking at the openssl-blacklist package, it should be relatively easy for me to generate all possible RSA key-pairs and I believe all other material that is hashed to generate the fingerprint are also available (RFC 4880#12.2). Thus it should be reasonably possible to generate matching private keys, generate revocation certificates and publish the revocation certificate with pointers to CVE-2008-0166. (Or email it to the people who have signed given monkeysphered keys). When I have a minute I will work on generating openpgp-blacklist type of scripts to address this.

If anyone is interested in the Go source code I've written to process openpgp packets, please drop me a line and I'll publish it on github or something.

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