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OnHub Router -- Google's Smart Home Trojan Horse?

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 2:56md
An anonymous reader writes: A couple weeks ago, Google surprised everybody by announcing a new piece of hardware: the OnHub Wi-Fi router. It packs a ton of processing power and a bunch of wireless radios into a glowy cylinder, and they're going to sell it for $200, which is on the high end for home networking equipment. Google sent out a number of units for testing, and the reviews are starting to come out. The device is truly Wi-Fi-centric, with only a single port for an ethernet cable. It runs on a Qualcomm IPQ8064 dual-core 1.4GHz SoC with 1GB of RAM and 4GB of storage. You can only access the router's admin settings by using the associated app on a mobile device. OnHub's data transfer speeds couldn't compete with a similarly priced Asus router, but it had no problem blanketing the area with a strong signal. Ron Amadeo puts his conclusion simply: "To us, this looks like Google's smart home Trojan horse." The smartphone app that accompanies OnHub has branding for something called "Google On," which they speculate is Google's new hub for smart home products. "There are tons of competing smart home protocols out there, all of which are incompatible with one another—imagine HD-DVD versus Blu-Ray, but with about five different players. ... Other than Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, everything in OnHub is a Google/Nest/Alphabet protocol. And remember, the "Built for Google On" stamp on the bottom of the OnHub sure sounds like a third-party certification program."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Unearthed E.T. Atari Game Cartridges Score $108K At Auction

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 2:13md
MojoKid writes: Hundreds of Atari 2600 cartridges of E.T. The Extra Terrestrial that were excavated last year from a landfill in Alamogordo, New Mexico collectively raked in nearly $108,000 through eBay auctions. Some $65,000 of that will go to the city of Alamogordo, while the Tularosa Basin Historical Society will receive over $16,000. Over $26,600 went to shipping fees and other expenses. A team of excavators led by operational consultant Joe Lewandowski unearthed the E.T. cartridges in front of a film crew. The high profile (among gaming historians) dig was the basis a documentary called Atari: Game Over, which is available for free through the Microsoft Store.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Felipe Borges: Joining Red Hat

Planet GNOME - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 1:54md

September the 1st will be my Day 1 at Red Hat. After being around the GNOME community for 6 years, participating in projects such as Google Summer of Code, and working at Parafernalia on gtk apps for the amazing Endless’ operating system, I’m embarking on my most challenging and exciting position to date.

Red Hat is a great company, leader in providing open source solutions for server, desktop, virtualization and so on. It’s the top corporate contributor to dozens of projects we love, and it has been recently ranked among Forbes’ top 10 best software companies to work for. Cool, isn’t it?

I have moved to the amazing Brno, Czech Republic. I’m super excited! I will be working on the desktop team, so keep locked for my blog reports.

"McKinley" Since 1917, Alaska's Highest Peak Is Redesignated "Denali"

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 1:28md
NPR reports that the Alaskan mountain which has for nearly a century been known officially as Mt. McKinley will revert to the name under which it's been known for a much longer time: Denali. President Obama is to "make a public announcement of the name change in Anchorage Monday, during a three-day visit to Alaska." Interior Secretary Sally Jewell's secretarial order of August 28th declares the name change to be immediately effective, and directs the United States Board on Geographic Names "to immediately implement this name change, including changing the mountain's name in the Board's Geographic Names Information System and notifying all interested parties of the name change."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

These were the biggest hacks at Black Hat and Def Con 2015

LinuxSecurity.com - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 11:38pd
LinuxSecurity.com: Weren't in Vegas? Here's what you need to know Hacks, exploits, vulnerabilities -- it's time to showcase them all. In a ten-day security extravaganza in Las Vegas, NV, the world's best security experts, hackers, and researchers come together to show the world how utterly unsafe it is.

Oh Good, the Weaponized Police Drones Are Here

LinuxSecurity.com - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 11:36pd
LinuxSecurity.com: We're still feeling the ripple effect from the Ashley Madison hack this week. Not only is its parent company, Avid Life Media, offering a $500K CDN reward for info on the hackers, and not only are the lawsuits rolling in, but on Friday CEO Noel Bidermen stepped down.

next-20150831: linux-next

Kernel Linux - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 10:58pd
Version:next-20150831 (linux-next) Released:2015-08-31
Kategoritë: Kernel Linux

T-Mobile Starts Going After Heavy Users of Tethered Data

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 10:29pd
VentureBeat reports that T-Mobile CEO John Legere has announced that T-Mobile will cut off (at least from "unlimited" data plans) customers who gloss over the fine print of their data-use agreement by tethering their unlimited-data phones and grab too much of the network's resources. In a series of tweets on Sunday, Legere says the company will be "eliminating anyone who abuses our network," and complains that some "network abusers" are using 2TB of data monthly. The article says, "This is the first official word from the carrier that seems to confirm a memo that was leaked earlier this month. At that time, it was said action would be taken starting August 17 and would go after those who used their unlimited LTE data for Torrents and peer-to-peer networking."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Fake EFF site serving espionage malware was likely active for 3+ weeks

LinuxSecurity.com - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 10:27pd
LinuxSecurity.com: A spear-phishing campaign some researchers say is linked to the Russian government masqueraded as the Electronic Frontier Foundation in an attempt to infect targets with malware that collects passwords and other sensitive data.

Christian Hergert: Keyboard Shortcuts

Planet GNOME - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 10:22pd

Many of you have asked for help with keyboard shortcuts in Builder. It was always something we wanted to do, but I was humbly waiting for upstream to get that into the toolkit so we would get it for “free”.

Since that didn’t happen this cycle, I rushed Allan to put together an updated design and I set out to implement it for 3.18. You’ll notice type-ahead search and a nice visual style.

The original “hack” of an implementation used XMACROs. For those of you that write C and don’t know what that is, look it up. I’ll wait. Now that you can see the shock and horror, you’ll be happy to know I didn’t go that route in the long term. The code isn’t ready to be generally usable, but it’s in better shape now that I added a custom GtkBuilder parser. Example here.

There is still much to do, but this will help you get started!

Martín Ferrari: Romania

Planet Debian - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 8:59pd

It's been over 2 years since I decided to start a new, nomadic life. I had the idea of blogging about this experience as it happened, but not only I am incredibly lazy when it comes to writing, most of the time I have been too busy just enjoying this lifestyle!

The TL;DR version of these last 2 years:

  • Lounged a bit in Ireland after leaving work, went on a great road trip along the West coast.
  • Lived in Nice 3 months, back in the same house I lived between 2009 and 2010.
    • During that time, my dad visited and took him for a trip around Nothern Italy, the Côte d'Azur and Paris; then travelled to DebConf in Switzerland, visited Gregor in Innsbruck, and travelled back to Nice by train, crossing the alps and a big chunk of Italy.
  • Then went to Buenos Aires for 3 months (mom was very happy).
  • Back in Europe, attended Fosdem, and moved to Barcelona for 3 months; so far, the best city I ever lived in!
  • Went back to Dublin for a while, ended up staying over 8 months, including getting a temporary job at a normal office (booo!).
    • Although one of these months I spent travelling in the States (meh).
    • And of course, many more short trips, including a couple of visits to Barcelona, Lille, Nice, and of course Brussels for Fosdem.
  • Again went to Buenos Aires, only 2 months this time.
  • Another month in Dublin, then holidays visiting my friends in Lisbon, wedding in Oviedo, and a road trip around Asturias and Galicia.
  • From Spain I flew to Prague and stayed for 2 months (definitely not enough).
  • Quick trip to Dublin, then CCC camp and DebConf in Germany.

And now, I am in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

View from my window

Brain Cancer Claims Horror Maestro Wes Craven At 76

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 7:33pd
New submitter JamesA writes: Wes Craven, the famed writer-director of horror films known for the Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream movies, died Sunday after a battle with brain cancer. He was 76. Though he's far less known as a novelist than for his various horror film jobs (writer, director, producer, actor ...), Craven also wrote a few books; I can't vouch for "Coming of Rage," but "Fountain Society" is pretty solid speculative fiction. Wikipedia notes that Craven also "designed the Halloween 2008 logo for Google, and was the second celebrity personality to take over the YouTube homepage on Halloween."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Martín Ferrari: IkiWiki

Planet Debian - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 6:55pd

I haven't posted in a very long time. Not only because I suck at this, but also because IkiWiki decided to stop working with OpenID, so I can't use the web interface any more to post.. Very annoying.

Already spent a good deal of time trying to find a solution, without any success.. I really don't want to migrate to another software again, but this is becoming a showstopper for me.

Og Maciel: Books - August 2015

Planet GNOME - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 6:00pd

This August 2015 I took a break from work and spent about 6 days enjoying some R&R down the North Carolina shore with my family. I managed to get through some of the books that were waiting for a long time for me to get to them, as well as try some new authors.

Read
  • The Sentinel by Arthur C. Clarke

    I forgot where I read about how the short story "The Sentinel" was the inspiration for "2001: A Space Odyssey", but being that I have always considered the latter a great book and movie, I managed to grab a copy of the anthology "The Sentinel" just so that I could read the short story by the same name and see what else Arthur C. Clarke "had to offer." Interestingly enough (to me), most if not all the other short stories included in this collection could easily be published today and still feel just as futuristic as they probably were back when they were first published! This was yet another one of the books that I read by the beach this Summer and though it didn't blow me away, it was still a very relaxing read.

  • A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs

    This last June I got from my family for my birthday "John Carter of Mars" containing the complete series and I was just itching for a good opportunity to start reading it. That chance came up this week as I started reading some of Melville's short stories and found that I needed a bit of a "break". First off, I have never read Edgar Rice Burroughs before but I do have a copy of "Tarzan of the Apes" also awaiting for a chance, so I had an idea about what to expect from his style. Sure enough, reading "A Princess of Mars" felt like a taking a trip down memory's lane, back when it was easy to tell who the good and the bad guys were, and there was always a damsel in distress somewhere waiting to be rescued. I have to confess that it took me a few chapters to get re-acclimated with this style, but once I got into it, it was easy reading, which is exactly what I was looking for any how.

    John Carter, the main character, shows all the expected, cliché virtues one would expect from a "hero" but one thing that bothered me a bit was the language he used to describe those who were different from him (which was mostly everyone in the story, since they were all Martians) and the way he treated them. It felt a bit abusive and even a but racist? I don't know if someone could get away with writing in the same style today, but then again I remembered that back then people were not as politically correct as we are today... or maybe I was reading too much into it? Anyhow, it was a fun read and I think I will try to add the next 4 books of the series in the coming months so that I can hopefully get a better opinion formed about the author.

Russ Allbery: Review: Through Struggle, The Stars

Planet Debian - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 5:54pd

Review: Through Struggle, The Stars, by John J. Lumpkin

Series: Human Reach #1 Publisher: John J. Lumpkin Copyright: July 2011 ISBN: 1-4611-9544-6 Format: Kindle Pages: 429

Never let it be said that I don't read military SF. However, it can be said that I read books and then get hellishly busy and don't review them for months. So we'll see if I can remember this well enough to review it properly.

In Lumpkin's future world, mankind has spread to the stars using gate technology, colonizing multiple worlds. However, unlike most science fiction futures of this type, it's not all about the United States, or even the United States and Russia. The great human powers are China and Japan, with the United States relegated to a distant third. The US mostly maintains its independence from either, and joins the other lesser nations and UN coalitions to try to pick up a few colonies of its own. That's the context in which Neil and Rand join the armed services: the former as a pilot in training, and the latter as an army grunt.

This is military SF, so of course a war breaks out. But it's a war between Japan and China: improved starship technology and the most sophisticated manufacturing in the world against a much larger economy with more resources and a larger starting military. For reasons that are not immediately clear, and become a plot point later on, the United States president immediately takes an aggressive tone towards China and pushes the country towards joining the war on the side of Japan.

Most of this book is told from Neil's perspective, following his military career during the outbreak of war. His plans to become a pilot get derailed as he gets entangled with US intelligence agents (and a bad supervisor). The US forces are not in a good place against China, struggling when they get into ship-to-ship combat, and Neil's ship goes on a covert mission to attempt to complicate the war with political factors. Meanwhile, Rand tries to help fight off a Chinese invasion of one of the rare US colony worlds.

Through Struggle, The Stars does not move quickly. It's over 400 pages, and it's a bit surprising how little happens. What it does instead is focus on how the military world and the war feels to Neil: the psychological experience of wanting to serve your country but questioning its decisions, the struggle of working with people who aren't always competent but who you can't just make go away, the complexities of choosing a career path when all the choices are fraught with politics that you didn't expect to be involved in, and the sheer amount of luck and random events involved in the progression of one's career. I found this surprisingly engrossing despite the slow pace, mostly because of how true to life it feels. War is not a never-ending set of battles. Life in a military ship has moments when everything is happening far too quickly, but other moments when not much happens for a long time. Lumpkin does a great job of reflecting that.

Unfortunately, I thought there were two significant flaws, one of which means I probably won't seek out further books in this series.

First, one middle portion of the book switches away from Neil to follow Rand instead. The first part of that involves the details of fighting orbiting ships with ground-based lasers, which was moderately interesting. (All the technological details of space combat are interesting and thoughtfully handled, although I'm not the sort of reader who will notice more subtle flaws. But David Weber this isn't, thankfully.) But then it turns into a fairly generic armed resistance story, which I found rather boring.

It also ties into the second and more serious flaw: the villain. The overall story is constructed such that it doesn't need a personal villain. It's about the intersection of the military and politics, and a war that may be ill-conceived but that is being fought anyway. That's plenty of conflict for the story, at least in my opinion. But Lumpkin chose to introduce a specific, named Chinese character in the villain role, and the characterization is... well.

After he's humiliated early in the story by the protagonists, Li Xiao develops an obsession with killing them, for his honor, and then pursues them throughout the book in ways that are sometimes destructive to the Chinese war efforts. It's badly unrealistic compared to the tone of realism taken by the rest of the story. Even if someone did become this deranged, it's bizarre that a professional military (and China's forces are otherwise portrayed as fairly professional) would allow this. Li reads like pure caricature, and despite being moderately competent apart from his inexplicable (but constantly repeated) obsession, is cast in a mustache-twirling role of personal villainy. This is weirdly out of place in the novel, and started irritating me enough that it took me out of the story.

Through Struggle, The Stars is the first book of a series, and does not resolve much by the end of the novel. That plus its length makes the story somewhat unsatisfying. I liked Neil's development, and liked him as a character, and those who like the details of combat mixed with front-lines speculation about politics may enjoy this. But a badly-simplified mustache-twirling victim and some extended, uninteresting bits mar the book enough that I probably won't seek out the sequels.

Followed by The Desert of Stars.

Rating: 6 out of 10

F-35 To Face Off Against A-10 In CAS Test

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 4:46pd
An anonymous reader writes: Lara Seligman from Defense News reports that the capabilities of the Joint Strike Fighter are to be evaluated for close-air support (CAS) missions. She writes, "To gauge the joint strike fighter's ability to perform in a close-air support role, the Pentagon's top weapons tester has declared the sleek new fighter jet must face off against the lumbering A-10. The Pentagon's Office of Operational Test and Evaluation plans to pit the full-up F-35 against the legacy A-10 Warthog and potentially other fighter jets to evaluate the next-generation aircraft's ability to protect soldiers on the ground."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

CenturyLink Takes $3B In Subsidies For Building Out Rural Broadband

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 1:55pd
New submitter club77er writes with a link to DSL Reports article outlining some hefty subsidies (about $3 billion, all told) that CenturyLink has signed up to receive, in exchange for expanding its coverage to areas considered underserved: According to the CenturyLink announcement, the telco will take $500 million a year for six years from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)'s Connect America Fund (CAF). In exchange, it will expand broadband to approximately 1.2 million rural households and businesses in 33 states. While the FCC now defines broadband as 25 Mbps down, these subsidies require that the deployed services be able to provide speeds of at least 10 Mbps down.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

NSF Makes It Rain: $722K Award To Evaluate Microsoft-Backed TEALS

Slashdot.org - Hën, 31/08/2015 - 12:49pd
theodp writes: Microsoft has $92 billion in cash parked offshore, so it's kind of surprising to see a $722K National Science Foundation award is going towards validating the efficacy of Microsoft TEALS, the pet program of CEO Satya Nadella that sends volunteer software engineers with no teaching experience into high schools to teach kids and their teachers computer science. Among its Program Changes for 2015, TEALS said it "explicitly commits to provide a core set of curriculum materials that are complete, organized, and adaptable," which should help improve the outcome of the Developing Computer Science Pedagogical Content Knowledge through On-the-Job Learning NSF study schools are being asked to participate in. Meanwhile, CSTUY, a volunteer organization led by experienced CS teachers (including Slashdot user zamansky), finds itself turning to Kickstarter for $25K to fund Saturday Hacking Sessions. So, as Microsoft-backed Code.org — which has also attracted NSF award money to validate its CS program — is fond of saying: What's wrong with this picture? (To be fair to TEALS: it may have Microsoft backing, but it's not strictly a Microsoft effort, and also started out as a pure volunteer effort, as founder Kevin Wang explained earlier this year.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Assange Says Harrods Assisting Metro Police in 'Round-the-Clock Vigil

Slashdot.org - Dje, 30/08/2015 - 11:51md
The Daily Mail reports that Julian Assange seems to have yet another foe (or at least friend of a foe) watching persistently while he stays put in the Ecuadorean embassy in London: Harrod's Department Store. The Metro Police, according to Assange, have developed a relationship with the store, and are using that relationship to facilitate their full-time observation of his roosting place in the embassy. When the founder of Wikileaks says "‘We have obtained documents from Harrods [saying that] police have people stationed 24 hours a day in some of the opposing buildings Harrods controls," it seems likely that those documents actually exist.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Jono Bacon: Go and back the Mycroft Kickstarter campaign

Planet UBUNTU - Dje, 30/08/2015 - 11:42md

Disclaimer: I am not a member of the Mycroft team, but I think this is neat and an important example of open innovation that needs support.

Mycroft is an Open Source, Open Hardware, Open APIs product that you talk to and it provides information and services. It is a wonderful example of open innovation at work.

They are running a kickstarter campaign that is pretty close to the goal, but it needs further backers to nail it.

I recorded a short video about why I think this is important. You can watch it here.

I encourage you to go and back the campaign. This kind of open innovation across technology, software, hardware, and APIs is how we make the world a better and more hackable place.

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