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Përditësimi: 4 ditë 16 orë më parë

Didier Roche: Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: A new ubuntu default theme, call for participation!

Enj, 09/11/2017 - 3:54md
Call for participation: an ubuntu default theme lead by the community?

As part of our Unity 7 to GNOME Shell transition in 17.10, we had last August a Fit and Finish Sprint at the London office to get the Shell feeling more like Ubuntu and we added some tweaks to our default GTK theme.

The outcome can be seen in the following posts:

Some more refinements came in afterward and finale 17.10 has a slightly modified look, but the general feedback we got from the community is that the ubuntu GNOME Shell session really looks and feels like ubuntu.

So I guess, objective completed (next level, attribute your earned point to person’s skills… :p).

All done?

However, as in any good RPG, this isn’t the real end of the story (there is the next boss!): we heard as well some people (on the community hub, in blog post comments) asking for a more drastic refresh of our theme and we generally agree with this. That would be a good idea to rebase and refresh our desktop with the help of the community!

For any themes, there are multiple parts:

  • The Shell theme itself (css).
  • The GTK3 and GTK 2 theme. The first one is using css, the second is some C code.
  • An icon theme.

Here is thus a call for participation if you are interesting into getting into that journey with us. The idea is to have few people (I think, 2-3 people + Alan Pope and I), having contributed to popular shell or GTK themes already, leading this project. That way, we can define what changes to the theme feels like “ubuntu” or not. We will coordinate all the work on the community hub to ensure that every decision is public and explain why.

We will sync regularly with the Canonical design theme (we have one meeting at the end of the month already) to check progress and get advice. Once the theme for the Shell, and GTK bindings are ready, we’ll switch the default ubuntu to it. That may or may not happen for the LTS, depending on the advancement. If it’s not ready to be switched by default, we will thus give instructions for our advanced users to get a taste of what’s currently cooking up :)

How do we get that going?

The idea is to restart from scratch, basing on upstream (GNOME) work. Indeed, the current ubuntu theme is in pure css, upstream is using sass. The Shell theme itself didn’t deviate much, but the general idea is:

for GTK3 apps, starting from Adwaita (default GNOME theme), and modify constants and slight behavior modifications in the sass files. That way, we don’t deviate too much and it will be easy to rebase with the numerous theme changes every new GTK release gets. for the Shell, using their sass files and tweaking for the same reasons. for the icon theme, we might start from our unity8 Suru icon set? Also, even if we hope that contributors from popular united and other themes will come along, the fact to start back from upstream’s playground provide a nice neutral and clean ground, we didn’t prevent from cherry-picking from what exists already. :)

Come with us!

Anyone can contribute (preferably via pull request on the projects we will created), however, in design, it’s always easier to have ideas than coming with concrete technical help ;). This is why there is this call to get some ideas of the number of people willing to spend some time on this project. The needs skills are either CSS (we’ll use SASS, more on that later) or C GTK theming. Also, Icon designers are more than welcome. :)

Excited? Join us! If you are interested (in either leading or just contributing), please post on this community hub topic your intents and ideas. Also, please reference your technical skills so that we can get an idea on the amount of awesome help we’ll get!

We’ll of course post more info on the same desktop section once we are ready to kick in the project! Hope, you are as thrilled by this project as we all are. ;)

Neil McGovern: Software Freedom Law Center and Conservancy

Mër, 08/11/2017 - 6:09md

Before I start, I would like to make it clear that the below is entirely my personal view, and not necessarily that of the GNOME Foundation, the Debian Project, or anyone else.

There’s been quite a bit of interest recently about the petition by Software Freedom Law Center to cancel the Software Freedom Conservancy’s trademark. A number of people have asked my views on it, so I thought I’d write up a quick blog on my experience with SFLC and Conservancy both during my time as Debian Project Leader, and since.

It’s clear to me that for some time, there’s been quite a bit of animosity between SFLC and Conservancy, which for me started to become apparent around the time of the large debate over ZFS on Linux. I talked about this in my DebConf 16 talk, which fortunately was recorded (ZFS bit from 8:05 to 17:30).

http://meetings-archive.debian.net/pub/debian-meetings/2016/debconf16/A_year_in_the_life_of_a_DPL.webm

 

This culminated in SFLC publishing a statement, and Conservancy also publishing their statement, backed up by the FSF. These obviously came to different conclusions, and it seems bizarre to me that SFLC who were acting as Debian’s legal counsel published a position that was contrary to the position taken by Debian. Additionally, Conservancy and FSF who were not acting as counsel mirrored the position of the project.

Then, I hear of an even more confusing move – that SFLC has filed legal action against Conservancy, despite being the organisation they helped set up. This happened on the 22nd September, the day after SFLC announced corporate and support services for Free Software projects.

SFLC has also published a follow up, which they say that the act “is not an attack, let alone a “bizarre” attack“, and that the response from Conservancy, who view it as such “was like reading a declaration of war issued in response to a parking ticket“. Then, as SFLC somehow find the threat of your trademark being taken away as something other than an attack, they also state: “Any project working with the Conservancy that feels in any way at risk should contact us. We will immediately work with them to put in place measures fully ensuring that they face no costs and no risks in this situation.” which I read as a direct pitch to try and pull projects away from Conservancy and over to SFLC.

Now, even if there is a valid claim here, despite the objections that were filed by a trademark lawyer who I have a great deal of respect for (disclosure: Pam also provides pro-bono trademark advice to my employer, the GNOME Foundation), the optics are pretty terrible. We have a case of one FOSS organisation taking another one to court, after many years of them being aware of the issue, and when wishing to promote a competing service. At best, this is a distraction from the supposed goals of Free Software organisations, and at worst is a direct attempt to interrupt the workings of an established and successful umbrella organisation which lots of projects rely on.

I truly hope that this case is simply dropped, and if I was advising SFLC, that’s exactly what I would suggest, along with an apology for the distress. Put it this way – if SFLC win, then they’re simply displaying what would be viewed as an aggressive move to hold the term “software freedom” exclusively to themselves. If they lose, then it shows that they’re willing to do so to another 501(c)3 without actually having a case.

Before I took on the DPL role, I was under the naive impression that although there were differences in approach, at least we were coming to try and work together to promote software freedoms for the end user. Unfortunately, since then, I’ve now become a lot more jaded about exactly who, and which organisations hold our best interests at heart.

(Featured image by  Nick Youngson – CC-BY-SA-3.0 – http://nyphotographic.com/)

Sébastien Wilmet: GtkSourceView fundraising – September/October report

Mër, 08/11/2017 - 3:24md

I’ve launched two months ago a fundraising for the GtkSourceView library. I intend to write a report every two months, so that you can follow what’s going on in that project, and at the same occasion I can explain in more details some facets of the fundraising.

Only one maintainer (me)

For most of the code in GtkSourceView, there is basically only one remaining maintainer: myself. Tobias Schönberg helps to maintain and review some *.lang files (for the support of syntax highlighting), especially in the area of web development. But that’s it.

Here are the top 5 contributors, in terms of number of commits:

$ git shortlog -sn | head -5
1372 Sébastien Wilmet
531 Paolo Borelli
289 Ignacio Casal Quinteiro
200 Jesse van den Kieboom
149 Yevgen Muntyan

So you can see that I’m the first contributor. All the other developers also contributed during their free time, and they don’t have enough free time anymore (they have an unrelated full-time job, etc).

So in some way, the future of GtkSourceView rests in my hands.

File loading and saving

These past weeks my focus was on file loading and saving in Tepl (the incubator for GtkSourceView).

There are several layers for the file loading and saving:

  • The backend/toolkit part, i.e. the low-level API, it’s what I’ve added to GtkSourceView in 2014 but needs improvements.
  • The high-level API taking care of the frontend, part of the Tepl framework.
  • Some features that are built on top of the high-level API, for example an action to save all documents, or the auto-save to automatically save a document periodically.

For the first layer, the backend/toolkit part, Tepl provides two new things: file metadata (for example to save the cursor position) and a new file loader based on uchardet, to improve the character encoding auto-detection. This past month I’ve improved the new file loader, it is now in a good enough shape for most applications (but still lacks some features compared to the old file loader, so some work is still needed to be able to deprecate the old implementation).

For the second layer, I’ve started to create the high-level API. Creating the API is not the most difficult, the bulk of the work will be to improve what the implementation does internally (creating infobars, handling errors, etc).

The third layer has not yet started.

File loading and saving was not the only thing that I did these past two months, a lot of other smaller things have been done, for more details see the NEWS files:

Conclusion

Even if GtkSourceView already provides a lot of features, it is far from sufficient to create even a basic text editor (to have an implementation of a good quality). To give a concrete example, the core of gedit – if we remove all the plugins – is currently made of 40.000 lines of code! It’s a lot of work for a developer who wants to create a specialized text editor or a new IDE.

So my goal with GtkSourceView and Tepl is to make more code re-usable.

See the GtkSourceView fundraising on Liberapay. Thanks for your support!

Jeffrey Stedfast: EXCLUSIVE: Texas Massacre Hero, Stephen Willeford, Describes Stopping Gunman

Mar, 07/11/2017 - 9:18md


To donate to the Sutherland Springs Baptist Church to help them recover from this tragedy, check out this GoFundMe campaign.


Richard Hughes: Hardware CI Tests in fwupd

Mar, 07/11/2017 - 4:50md

Usually near the end of the process of getting a vendor on the LVFS I normally ask them to send me hardware for the tests. Once we’ve got a pretty good idea that the hardware update process is going to work with fwupd (i.e. they’re not insisting on some static linked ELF to be run…) and when they’ve got legal approval to upload the firmware to the LVFS (without an eyewateringly long EULA) we start thinking about how to test the hardware. Once we say “Product Foo from Vendor Bar is supported in Linux” we better make damn sure it doesn’t regress when something in the kernel changes or when someone refactors a plugin to support a different variant of a protocol.

To make this task a little more manageable, we have a little python script that helps automate the devices that can be persuaded to enter DFU mode themselves. To avoid chaos, I also have a little cardboard tray under a little HP Microserver with two 10-port USB hubs with everything organised. Who knew paper-craft would be such an important skill at Red Hat…

As the astute might notice, much of the hardware is a bare PCB. I don’t actually need the complete device for testing, and much of the donated hardware is actually a user return or with a cosmetic defect, or even just a pre-release PCB without the actual hardware attached. This is fine, and actually preferable to the entire device – I only have a small office!

As much of the hardware needs special handling to put it in update mode we can’t 100% automate this task, and sometimes it really is just me sitting in front of the laptop pressing and holding buttons for 30 minutes before uploading a tarball, but it’s sure it comforting to know that firmware updates are tested like this. As usual, thanks should be directed to Red Hat for letting me work on this kind of stuff, they really are a marvelous company to work for.

Christian Kellner: Linux on the T470s, suspend and fan noise

Mar, 07/11/2017 - 1:35md


Ever since we (Red Hat's Desktop Hardware Enablement Team) received the 2017 models from Lenovo for testing (e.g. the T470s), we experienced an issue (rhbz#1480844) where sometimes the fan would run at 100% after resuming from suspend. A warm reboot alone would not make the fan go back to normal and a hard reboot was required. It seems the behavior is the result of firmware bug and kernel ACPI changes. Patches for 4.13 reduced the likelihood for the appearance of the noisy issue. Additionally, we have been working together with Lenovo to fix the firmware side and I am happy to report that for the T470s Lenovo recently released a new firmware that should completely fix the issue. Since Lenovo is not yet(!) part of Linux Vendor Firmware Service updating the BIOS is currently not super straight-forward. Thankfully, Jeff has provided detailed instructions how to do this from GNU/Linux only.

Daniel G. Siegel: summing up 92

Mar, 07/11/2017 - 1:52pd

summing up is a recurring series on topics & insights that compose a large part of my thinking and work. drop your email in the box below to get it – and much more – straight in your inbox.

Crapularity Hermeneutics, by Florian Cramer

The problem of computational analytics is not only in the semantic bias of the data set, but also in the design of the algorithm that treats the data as unbiased fact, and finally in the users of the computer program who believe in its scientific objectivity.

From capturing to reading data, interpretation and hermeneutics thus creep into all levels of analytics. Biases and discrimination are only the extreme cases that make this mechanism most clearly visible. Interpretation thus becomes a bug, a perceived system failure, rather than a feature or virtue. As such, it exposes the fragility and vulnerabilities of data analytics. 

The paradox of big data is that it both affirms and denies this “interpretative nature of knowledge”. Just like the Oracle of Delphi, it is dependent on interpretation. But unlike the oracle priests, its interpretative capability is limited by algorithmics – so that the limitations of the tool (and, ultimately, of using mathematics to process meaning) end up defining the limits of interpretation. 

we're talking a lot about the advancement of computational analytics and artificial intelligence, but little about their shortcomings and effects on society. one of those is that for our technology to work perfectly, society has to dumb itself down in order to level the playing field between humans and computers. a very long but definitely one of the best essays i read this year.

Resisting the Habits of the Algorithmic Mind, by Michael Sacasas

Machines have always done things for us, and they are increasingly doing things for us and without us. Increasingly, the human element is displaced in favor of faster, more efficient, more durable, cheaper technology. And, increasingly, the displaced human element is the thinking, willing, judging mind. Of course, the party of the concerned is most likely the minority party. Advocates and enthusiasts rejoice at the marginalization or eradication of human labor in its physical, mental, emotional, and moral manifestations. They believe that the elimination of all of this labor will yield freedom, prosperity, and a golden age of leisure. Critics meanwhile, and I count myself among them, struggle to articulate a compelling and reasonable critique of this scramble to outsource various dimensions of the human experience.

our reliance on machines to make decisions for us leads us to displace the most important human elements in favor of cheaper and faster technology. doing that however we outsource meaning-making, moral judgement and feeling – which is what a human being is – to machines.

Your Data is Being Manipulated, by Danah Boyd

The tech industry is no longer the passion play of a bunch of geeks trying to do cool shit in the world. It’s now the foundation of our democracy, economy, and information landscape.

We no longer have the luxury of only thinking about the world we want to build. We must also strategically think about how others want to manipulate our systems to do harm and cause chaos.

we're past the point where developing fancy new technologies is a fun project for college kids. our technologies have real implications on the world, on our culture and society. nevertheless we seem to miss a kind of moral framework on how technology is allowed to alter society.

Eitan Isaacson: Phoropter: A Vision Simulator

Hën, 06/11/2017 - 4:38md

After porting Aaron’s NoCoffee extension to Firefox, I thought it would be neat to make a camera version of that. Something you can carry around with you, and take snapshots of websites, signs, or print material. You can then easily share the issues you see around you.

I’m calling it Phoropter, and you can see it here (best viewed with Chrome or Firefox on Android).

I could imagine this is what Pokémon Go is like if instead of creatures you collected mediocre designs.

Say you are looking at a London Underground map, and you notice the legend is completely color reliant. Looking through Phoropter you will see what the legend would look like to someone with protanopia, red-green color blindness.

You can then grab a snapshot with the camera icon and get a side-by-side photo that shows the difference in perception. You can now alert the transit authorities, or at least shame them on Twitter.

Once you get into it, it’s quite addicting. No design is above scrutiny.

I started this project thinking I can pull it off with CSS filters on a video element, but it turns out that is way to slow. So I ended up using WebGL via glfx.js. Tried to make is as progressive as possible, you can add it to your home screen. I won’t bore you with the details, check out the source when you have a chance.

There are still many more filters I can add later. In the meantime, open this in your mobile browser and,


Christian Kellner: FOSDEM 2018 Hardware Enablement Devroom Call for Participation

Hën, 06/11/2017 - 2:20md

FOSDEM 2018 is approaching fast. There will be a Hardware Enablement Devroom, among many other very interesting ones. We invite everybody to come and participate:

Important dates
  • Conference date: 3 & 4 February 2018 in Brussels, Belgium
  • Devroom date: Sunday 4 February 2018
  • Submission deadline: Sunday 26 November 2017
  • Speaker notified: Sunday 10 December 2017
About

In this devroom we want to discuss topics surrounding hardware enablement. Subjects can range from the firmware running on the bare metal machine, drivers and plumbing all the way to the user interface.
We welcome a board range of presentations, including but not limited to technical talks, state of union summaries as well as discussions that facilitate the collaboration between community members, software vendors and OEMs. A particular emphasis will be given to talks covering a significant part of the software stack involved in hardware enablement, with an obvious focus on using open source throughout the whole stack.

Visit https://fosdem.org for general information about FOSDEM.

Talk Format
  • To cover the wide range of topics we will prefer short talks (about 15-25 minutes). Please include at least 5 minutes for discussions and questions.
  • Presentations will be recorded and streamed. Sending your proposal implies giving permission to be recorded. Exceptions may be possible.
  • Proposals need to be submitted via pentabarf  (see "Submission" below for details)
Topics & Examples
  • UX design to enable users to use their HW effectively
  • Firmware:
    • coreboot
    • flashrom
    • UEFI EDK2 (Tianocore)
    • Security
    • Lockdown of platform using firmware
    • Updating
  • Secure Boot
  • Hardware testing / certification
  • Thunderbolt 3 security modes
  • Gaming input devices (keyboards, mice, piper)
  • Biometric authentication
  • Miracast or controlling remote devices
  • Why vendors should facilitate upstream development
Submission

The FOSDEM Pentabarf is used for submission and scheduling:

  • Please reuse and existing account otherwise register a new one.
  • Please provide your full name and email address. If you provide bio then this will be visible publically.
  • Create a new event:
    • Select "Hardware Enablement devroom" as the track
    • Provide a descriptive title
    • Provide a public abstract for your talk
    • Add any further information for paper review into the submission notes (e.g. outline, why this devroom)

Calum Benson: Sunset

Hën, 06/11/2017 - 1:50md

Edit: Since writing this post, I’ve been re-hired by another UX team at Oracle. I apologise to anyone who thinks this makes me a Bad Person.

Sun badge photo, August 2000

Seventeen years and a few months after I joined Sun, today is my last day at Oracle.

I was already a grizzled 7-year usability veteran when I moved to Ireland in 2000 to work on GNOME for Solaris, and by extension, try to help the GNOME community figure out how to focus on and deal with usability issues. While it’s been a handful of years since I last actively did that, I’m posting this from our latest build of GNOME 3 on Solaris, so I guess I didn’t completely break everything.

Presenting GNOME usability study results, GUADEC 2001

I’ve no idea what I’ll be doing next, but I do know it’s been a privilege to work with some of the smartest people in tech, not least in the the GNOME community, and the related open source projects that I worked on over the years. So to all of you reading this, thanks for that.

If anyone’s looking for a UX designer based just far enough outside Dublin that he’d prefer not to have to commute there every day, you can find me on LinkedIn, or any of the other places on the interwebs you’d expect. (As an emeritus foundation member, I even still have a gnome.org email address… but don’t use that as I haven’t updated my .forward file yet!)

Tomeu Vizoso: Experiments with crosvm

Hën, 06/11/2017 - 8:06pd
Last week I played a bit with crosvm, a KVM monitor used within Chromium OS for application isolation. My goal is to learn more about the current limits of virtualization for isolating applications in mainline. Two of crosvm's defining characteristics is that it's written in Rust for increased security, and that uses namespaces extensively to reduce the attack surface of the monitor itself.

It was quite easy to get it running outside Chromium OS (have been testing with Fedora 26), with the only complication being that minijail isn't widely packaged in distros. In the instructions below we hack around the issue with linker environment variables so we don't have to install it properly. Instructions are in form of shell commands for illustrative purposes only.

Build kernel:
$ cd ~/src
$ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git
$ cd linux
$ git checkout v4.12
$ make x86_64_defconfig
$ make bzImage
$ cd .. Build minijail:
$ git clone https://android.googlesource.com/platform/external/minijail
$ cd minijail
$ make
$ cd .. Build crosvm:
$ git clone https://chromium.googlesource.com/a/chromiumos/platform/crosvm
$ cd crosvm
$ LIBRARY_PATH=~/src/minijail cargo build Generate rootfs:
$ cd ~/src/crosvm
$ dd if=/dev/zero of=rootfs.ext4 bs=1K count=1M
$ mkfs.ext4 rootfs.ext4
$ mkdir rootfs/
$ sudo mount rootfs.ext4 rootfs/
$ debootstrap testing rootfs/
$ sudo umount rootfs/Run crosvm:
$ LD_LIBRARY_PATH=~/src/minijail ./target/debug/crosvm run -r rootfs.ext4 --seccomp-policy-dir=./seccomp/x86_64/ ~/src/linux/arch/x86/boot/compressed/vmlinux.binThe work ahead includes figuring out the best way for Wayland clients in the guest interact with the compositor in the host, and also for guests to make efficient use of the GPU.

Umang Jain: GNOME Asia 2017

Sht, 04/11/2017 - 7:10pd

Finally, I got opportunity to write about my first and awesome GNOME Asia 2017. This year is a special year for GNOME as it’s the 20th anniversary of GNOME and 10th anniversary of GNOME Asia conference.

GNOME Asia was hosted at Chongqing University, Chongqing this year which happens to be known as 3D city built on and around mountains. It was also my first experience in China as a visitor. I was excited.

The conference organization committee demonstrated a top-quality management of events and participants. Be it the awesome welcome dinner or helping people like me be picked up at the airport, I am happy and applaud everyone who was involved to give a more than smooth experience overall. Some of special mention I am very grateful for:

  • Airport Pickup
  • I had booked Airbnb apartment near to Liyuan hotel, so one of the member helped me to find my apartment, talked to the owner(only mandarin-speaking) and get things sorted for me
  • Day trip (that was a great idea)

The conference have had so many educating talks. Nuritzi’s keynote was fantastic, Flatpaks by Matthias Clasen, Endless OS by Cosimo, Lennart Pottering’s Fully protected desktop talk got a bit technical for me but I was contented that I understood the main highlights. There were many more which were good to watch and engage in QA. I am pretty intrigued by rpm+OSTree talk by David King. I also did manage to give a lightening talk regarding the Linux graphics stack. Overall, it was fun and was glad that I got the opportunity to meet all these people in person this year as I missed on GUADEC this year :-(

Again, I would like to thank all the members, volunteers who did GNOME Asia a huge success. I am now friends with few of them now as I hopefully remember their names and even in touch. I am hoping to meet you next year o/

Some captures:








Thank you GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my travel and accomodation.


Jonathan Kang: GNOME.Asia 2017

Pre, 03/11/2017 - 8:54pd

GNOME.Asia 2017 was held in ChongQing, China. It is my first time to ChongQing, and I like it very much in many aspects. The city is built around mountains, so the there are lots of roads that are not straight, which is completely different with the roads in Beijing. There are lots of ups and downs, too. That’s why you can barely see someone riding a bike there. It can be dangerous and tiring, too. Besides, there are lots of overpasses, which makes the city more 3D. The city is also built along the Yangzi River, so you can see many bridges(like London, I think). Here are some photos of the city:

Back to the conference. I really like the keynote titled “The Future of GNOME is You” given by Nuritzi. It tells the students that they can make impact on what the future of GNOME is by starting to contribute. It’s also a goal of GNOME.Asia. That’s to try to get more people involved in GNOME/open source.

I gave a lighting talk in the first afternoon. It was about Google Summer of Code. In China, not many university students know about this project. I applied it in 2015 and I learned a lot from the whole process. It was an amazing experience, so I hope more students know it and apply it.

The conference is really a success and I have to thank those local organizers, volunteers and everyone who make it happen.

Here are some random photos from this trip. Enjoy.

Thanks GNOME Foundation for supporting my trip and my employer SUSE for my time and this trip.

Richard Hughes: Quirks in fwupd as key files

Enj, 02/11/2017 - 8:35md

In my previous blog post I hinted at you just have to add one line to a data file to add support for new AVR32 microcontrollers and this blog entry should give a few more details.

A few minutes ago I merged a PR that moves the database of supported and quirked devices out of the C code and into runtime loaded files. When fwupd is installed in long-term support distros it’s very hard to backport new versions as new hardware is released. The idea with this functionalty is that the end user can drop an additional (or replace an existing) file in a .d directory with a simple format and the hardware will magically start working. This assumes no new quirks are required, as this would obviously need code changes, but allows us to get most existing devices working in an easy way without the user compiling anything.

The quirk files themselves are simple key files and are documented in the fwupd gtk-doc documentation.

Sebastian Pölsterl: scikit-survival 0.4 released and presented at PyCon UK 2017

Enj, 02/11/2017 - 12:06pd

I'm pleased to announce that scikit-survival version 0.4 has been released.

This release adds CoxnetSurvivalAnalysis, which implements an efficient algorithm to fit Cox’s proportional hazards model with LASSO, ridge, and elastic net penalty. This allows fitting a Cox model to high-dimensional data and perform feature selection. Moreover, it includes support for Windows with Python 3.5 and later by making the cvxopt package optional.

Download

You can install the latest version via Anaconda (OSX and Linux):

conda install scikit-survival

or via pip (all platforms):

pip install -U scikit-survival PyCon UK

Last week, I presented an Introduction to Survival Analysis with scikit-survival at PyCon UK in Cardiff in front of a packed audience of genuinely interested people. I hope some people will give scikit-survial a try and use it in their work.

The slides of my presentation are available at https://k-d-w.org/pyconuk-2017/.

Robert Roth: GNOME Bug squash month

Mër, 01/11/2017 - 7:56md
I feel like I have failed as a maintainer of GNOME modules, due to the fact that I have been busy lately with other tasks, and could not really handle my maintainer tasks, bugfixing, but it is November again, Bug Squash Month for GNOME. I will do my best to take the challenge and do the 5-a-day (5 bugs triaged per day) for GNOME this month.


Today I had a couple of comments and fixes on System Monitor and Calculator, and probably I will continue tomorrow on these two, and jump to the games afterwards. If you have any annoyances, would like me to prioritize certain bugs (preferably from libgtop, system-monitor, gnome-calculator, swell-foop, lightsoff, five-or-more, atomix, gnome-mines), just let me know, and I will do my best.