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Përditësimi: 6 ditë 5 orë më parë

Karuna Grewal: Outreachy's finally here !

Mër, 06/12/2017 - 5:22md

It’s been a month since the Outreachy Round 15 results were announced . Yay! my proposal for adding a network panel to GNOME Usage was selected. I am glad to be working on something I personally have been longing for. Moreover, I finally have something to cut down on my Xbox addiction and channelize it into bringing the network panel to life.
It’s going to be really amazing working with my mentor Felipe Borges , and Usage’s co-maintainer Petr Stetka ,given their experience and expertise.

Here’s a walkthrough of what the project is all about:

Currently there are not many Linux based GUI tools to monitor network statistics on our system ,unlike the CLI tools. Network Panel in GNOME-Usage will serve the purpose of making a UI available at the user’s service enabling them to monitor their network in a process oriented manner.

This panel can be designed to provide not only the per-process data transfer rates ,but also other details : open ports dedicated to some service (this can be of a great use to start or stop services from a UI ), list of interfaces. Currently it’s not finalized what all additional data will be available apart from the data transfer rates, but this panel surely has loads of new things in store for the users.

Lately, I’ve been discussing with my mentor regarding the approach for the backend API , which we plan to be incorporated in libgtop. As the Outreachy round officially started yesterday ,I plan to dig into the libgtop codebase and get started with coding ,the most amazing part of this internship !

This week onwards, I will be regular with my blog posts , updating about my progress on the project.
Lots in store for the geeky network enthusiasts looking forward to having a new compelling look to otherwise conventional network details.

Stay tuned! :)

Tobias Bernard: UX Hackfest London

Mër, 06/12/2017 - 4:09md

Last week I took part in the GNOME Shell UX Hackfest in London, along with other designers and developers from GNOME and adjacent communities such as Endless, Pop!, and elementary. We talked about big, fundamental things, like app launching and the lock/login screen, as well as some smaller items, like the first-run experience and legacy window decorations.

I won’t recap everything in detail, because Cassidy from System76 has already done a great job at that. Instead, I want to highlight some of the things I found most interesting.

Spatial model

One of my main interests for this hackfest was to push for better animations and making better use of the spatial dimension in GNOME Shell. If you’ve seen my GUADEC Talk, you know about my grand plan to introduce semantic animations across all of GNOME, and the Shell is obviously no exception. I’m happy to report that we made good progress towards a clear, unified spatial model for GNOME Shell last week.

Everything we came up with are very early stage concepts at this point, but I’m especially excited about the possibility of having the login/unlock screen be part of the same space as the rest of the system, and making the transition between these fluid and semantic.

Tiling

Another utopian dream of mine is a tiling-first desktop. I’ve long felt that overlapping windows are not the best way to do multitasking on screens, and tiling is something I’m very interested in exploring as an alternative. Tiling window managers have long done this, but their UX is usually subpar. However, some text editors like Atom have pretty nice graphical implementations of tiling window managers nowadays, and I feel like this approach might be scalable enough to cover most OS-level use cases as well (perhaps with something like a picture-in-picture mode for certain use cases).

Tiling in the Atom text editor

We touched on this topic at various points during this hackfest, especially in relation to the resizable half-tiling introduced in 3.26, and the coming quarter-tiling. However, our current tech stack and the design of most apps are not well suited to a tiling-first approach, so this is unlikely ot happen anytime soon. That said, I want to keep exploring alternatives to free-floating, overlapping windows, and will report on my progress here.

Header bars everywhere

A topic we only briefly touched on, but which I care about a lot, was legacy window decorations (aka title bars). Even though header bars have been around for a while, there are still a lot of apps we all rely on with ugly, space-eating bars at the top (Inkscape, I’m looking at you).

On a 1366x768px display, a 35px title bar takes up close to 5% of the entire screen.

We discussed possible solutions such as conditionally hiding title bars in certain situations, but finally decided that the best course of action is to work with apps upstream to add support for header bars. Firefox and Chromium are currently in the process of implementing this, and we want to encourage other third-party apps to do the same.

Firefox with client-side decorations (in development)

This will be a long and difficult process, but it will result in better apps for everyone, instead of hacky partial solutions. The work on this has just begun, and I’ll blog more about it as this initiative develops.

In summary, I think the hackfest set a clear direction for the future of GNOME Shell, and one that I’m excited to work towards. I’d like to thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring my attendance, Allan and Mario for organizing the hackfest, and everyone who attended for being there, and being awesome! Until next time!

Bastien Nocera: UTC and Anywhere on Earth support

Mër, 06/12/2017 - 3:32md
A quick post to tell you that we finally added UTC support to Clocks' and the Shell's World Clocks section. And if you're into it, there's also Anywhere on Earth support.

You will need to have git master versions of libgweather (our cities and timezones database), and gnome-clocks. This feature will land in GNOME 3.28.



Many thanks to Giovanni for coming up with an API he was happy with after I attempted a couple of iterations on one. Enjoy!

Update: As expected, a bug crept in. Thanks to Colin Guthrie for spotting the error in the "Anywhere on Earth" timezone. See this section for the fun we have to deal with.

Julita Inca: Linux on Supercomputers

Mër, 06/12/2017 - 4:53pd

Today, I did a presentation about Linux on Supercomputers at the Faculty of  Industrial of UNMSM for its annivrsary. It was published the event in the Intranet of the School.

I started by presenting the project of Satoshi Sekiguchi from Japan, who is in charge of ABCI, a supercomputer that pretends to be the top1 in the list of supercomputers around the world. This project is expected to be done in April 18 to help simulations of earthquakes with 130 petaflops of speed in calculations. The top 5 of top500 list:The way supercomputers were measured with the Linpack tool and why Linux have been used in the most powerful supercomputers were also explained. History of supercomputers and techonology relate to were topics during the talk. I have also emphasized the importance of gathering a multidisciplinary group in a supercomputer project or in other parallelized computer architecture.

Thanks to the organizers for contacting to do this rewarding talk. Linux is important for scientific purposes as well as for education in Peru and around the world. 


Filed under: Education, Events, FEDORA, GNOME, GNU/Linux/Open Source, τεχνολογια :: Technology Tagged: ABCI, Facultad de Ingenieria Industrial, Julita Inca, Julita Inca Chiroque, linux, supercomputer talk, supercomputers, top500, UNMSM

Michael Meeks: 2017-12-05 Tuesday.

Mar, 05/12/2017 - 10:00md
  • Mail; admin. Lunch with J. Commercial call. Spent much of the day doing the things that are supposed to be quick & get done before you work on larger tasks - but somehow fill the time.
  • Out to the Hopbine in Cambridge in the evening with J. for a lovely Collabora Christmas party, good to catch up with the local part of the team.

Daniel G. Siegel: summing up 93

Mar, 05/12/2017 - 2:22pd

summing up is a recurring series on topics & insights that compose a large part of my thinking and work. drop your email in the box below to get it – and much more – straight in your inbox.

The future of humanity and technology, by Stephen Fry

Above all, be prepared for the bullshit, as AI is lazily and inaccurately claimed by every advertising agency and app developer. Companies will make nonsensical claims like "our unique and advanced proprietary AI system will monitor and enhance your sleep" or "let our unique AI engine maximize the value of your stock holdings". Yesterday they would have said "our unique and advanced proprietary algorithms" and the day before that they would have said "our unique and advanced proprietary code". But let's face it, they're almost always talking about the most basic software routines. The letters A and I will become degraded and devalued by overuse in every field in which humans work. Coffee machines, light switches, christmas trees will be marketed as AI proficient, AI savvy or AI enabled. But despite this inevitable opportunistic nonsense, reality will bite.

If we thought the Pandora's jar that ruined the utopian dream of the internet contained nasty creatures, just wait till AI has been overrun by the malicious, the greedy, the stupid and the maniacal. We sleepwalked into the internet age and we're now going to sleepwalk into the age of machine intelligence and biological enhancement. How do we make sense of so much futurology screaming in our ears?

Perhaps the most urgent need might seem counterintuitive. While the specialist bodies and institutions I've mentioned are necessary we need surely to redouble our efforts to understand who we humans are before we can begin to grapple with the nature of what machines may or may not be. So the arts and humanities strike me as more important than ever. Because the more machines rise, the more time we will have to be human and fulfill and develop to their uttermost, our true natures.

an outstanding lecture exploring the impact of technology on humanity by looking back at human history in order to understand the present and the future.

We're building a dystopia just to make people click on ads, by Zeynep Tufekci

We use digital platforms because they provide us with great value. I use Facebook to keep in touch with friends and family around the world. I've written about how crucial social media is for social movements. I have studied how these technologies can be used to circumvent censorship around the world. But it's not that the people who run Facebook or Google are maliciously and deliberately trying to make the world more polarized and encourage extremism. I read the many well-intentioned statements that these people put out. But it's not the intent or the statements people in technology make that matter, it's the structures and business models they're building. And that's the core of the problem.

So what can we do? We need to restructure the whole way our digital technology operates. Everything from the way technology is developed to the way the incentives, economic and otherwise, are built into the system. We have to mobilize our technology, our creativity and yes, our politics so that we can build artificial intelligence that supports us in our human goals but that is also constrained by our human values. And I understand this won't be easy. We might not even easily agree on what those terms mean. But if we take seriously how these systems that we depend on for so much operate, I don't see how we can postpone this conversation anymore. We need a digital economy where our data and our attention is not for sale to the highest-bidding authoritarian or demagogue.

no new technology has only a one-sided effect. every technology is always both a burden and a blessing. not either or, but this and that. what bothers me is that we seem to ignore the negative impact of new technologies, justifying this attitude with their positive aspects.

the bullet hole misconception, by daniel g. siegel

If you're never exposed to new ideas and contexts, if you grow up only being shown one way of thinking about the computer and being told that there are no other ways to think about this, you grow up thinking you know what we're doing. We have already fleshed out all the details, improved and optimized everything a computer has to offer. We celebrate alleged innovation and then delegate picking up the broken pieces to society, because it's not our fault – we figured it out already.

We have to tell ourselves that we haven't the faintest idea of what we're doing. We, as a field, haven't the faintest idea of what we're doing. And we have to tell ourselves that everything around us was made up by people that were no smarter than us, so we can change, influence and build things that make a small dent in the universe.

And once we understand that, only then might we be able to do what the early fathers of computing dreamed about: To make humans better – with the help of computers.

the sequel to my previous talk, the lost medium, on bullet holes in world war 2 bombers, page numbering, rotating point of views and how we can escape the present to invent the future.

Michael Meeks: 2017-12-04 Monday.

Hën, 04/12/2017 - 10:00md
  • Mail chew, consultancy call, synched with Dennis; admin: customer, partner contacts, variously. TDF board call.

Ruben Vermeersch: Distrinet R&D Bites

Hën, 04/12/2017 - 7:07md

The Distrinet Research Group at KULeuven (where I studied!), recently asked me to speak about “Cloud Native” at one of their R&D Bites sessions. My talk covered Kubernetes, cloud automation and all the cool new things we can do in this brave new cloud native world.

Annotated slides of the talk can be found here.


Comments | More on rocketeer.be | @rubenv on Twitter

Tobias Mueller: Talking at Cubaconf 2017 in Havanna, Cuba

Hën, 04/12/2017 - 1:09md

Few weeks ago I had a talk at Cubaconf 2017 in Havanna, Cuba. It’s certainly been an interesting experience. If only because of Carribean people. But also because of the food and the conditions the country has be run under the last decades.

Before entering Cuba, I needed a tourist visa in form of the turist trajeta. It was bothering me for more than it should have. I thought I’d have to go to the embassy or take a certain airline in order to be able to get hold of one of these cased. It turned out that you can simply buy these tourist cards in the Berlin airport from the TUI counter. Some claimed it was possible to buy at the immigration, but I couldn’t find any tourist visa for sale there, so be warned. Also, I read that you have to prove that you have health insurance, but nobody was interested in mine. That said, I think it’s extremely clever to have one…

Connecting to the Internet is a bit difficult in Cuba. I booked a place which had “Wifi” marked as their features and I naïvely thought that it meant that you by booking the place I also get to connect to the Internet. Turns out that it’s not entirely correct. It’s not entirely wrong either, though. In my case, there was an access point in the apartment in which I rented a room. The owner needs to turn it on first and run a weird managing software on his PC. That software then makes the AP connect to other already existing WiFis and bridges connections. That other WiFi, in turn, does not have direct Internet access, but instead somehow goes through the ISP which requires you to log in. The credentials for logging in can be bought in the ISPs shops. You can buy credentials worth 1 hour of WiFi connection (note that I’m avoiding the term “Internet” here) for 3 USD or so from the dealer around the corner. You can get your fix from the legal dealer cheaper (i.e. the Internet office…), but that will probably involve waiting in queues. I often noticed people gathering somewhere on the street looking into their phones. That’s where some signal was. When talking to the local hacker community, I found out that they were using a small PCB with an ESP8266 which repeats the official WiFi signal. The hope is that someone will connect to their piece of electronics so that the device is authenticated and also connects the other clients associated with the fake hotspot. Quite clever.

The conference was surprisingly well attended. I reckon it’s been around hundred people. I say surprisingly, because from all what I could see the event was weirdly organised. I had close to zero communication with the organisers and it was pure luck for me to show up in time. But other people seemed to be in the know so I guess I fell through the cracks somehow. Coincidentally, you could only install the conference’s app from Google, because they wouldn’t like to offer a plain APK that you can install. I also didn’t really know how long my talks should be and needed to prepare for anything between 15 and 60 minutes.

My first talk was on PrivacyScore.org, a Web scanner for privacy and security issues. As I’ve indicated, the conference was a bit messily organised. The person before me was talking into my slot and then there was no cable to hook my laptop up with the projector. We ended up transferring my presentation to a different machine (via pen drives instead of some fancy distributed local p2p network) in order for me to give my presentation. And then I needed to rush through my content, because we were pressed for going for lunch in time. Gnah. But I think a few people were still able to grasp the concepts and make it useful for them. My argument was that Web pages load much faster if you don’t have to load as many trackers and other external content. Also, these people don’t get updates in time, so they might rather want to visit Web sites which generally seem to care about their security. I was actually approached by a guy running StreetNet, the local DIY Internet. His idea is to run PrivacyScore against their network to see what is going on and to improve some aspects. Exciting.

My other talk was about GNOME and how I believe it makes more secure operating systems. Here, my thinking was that many people don’t have expectations of how their system is supposed to be looking or even working. And being thrown into the current world in which operating systems spy on you could lead to being primed to have low expectations of the security of the system. In the GNOME project, however, we believe that users must have confidence in their computing being safe and sound. To that end, Flatpak was a big thing, of course. People were quite interested. Mostly, because they know everything about Docker. My trick to hook these people is to claim that Docker does it all wrong. Then they ask pesky questions which gives me many opportunities to mention that for some applications squashfs is inferior to, say, OStree, or that you’d probably want to hand out privileges only for a certain time rather than the whole life-time of an app. I was also to make people look at EndlessOS which attempts to solve many problems I think Cubans have.

The first talk of the conference was given by Ismael and I was actually surprised to meet people I know. He talked about his hackerspace in Almería, I think. It was a bit hard to me to understand, because it was in Spanish. He was followed by Valessio Brito who talked about putting a price on Open Source Software. He said he started working on Open Source Software at the age of 16. He wondered how you determine how much software should cost. Or your work on Open Source. His answer was that one of the determining factors was simply personal preference of the work to be performed. As an example he said that if you were vegan and didn’t like animals to be killed, you would likely not accept a job doing exactly that. At least, you’d be inclined to demand a higher price for your time. That’s pretty much all he could advise the audience on what to do. But it may also very be that I did not understand everything because it was half English and half Spanish and I never noticed quickly enough that the English was on.

An interesting talk was given by Christian titled “Free Data and the Infrastructure of the Commons”. He began saying that the early textile industry in Lyon, France made use of “software” in 1802 with (hard wired) wires for the patterns to produce. With the rise of computers, software used to be common good in the early 1960s, he said. Software was a common good and exchanged freely, he said. The sharing of knowledge about software helped to get the industry going, he said. At the end of the 1970s, software got privatised and used to be licensed from the manufacturer which caused the young hacker movement to be felt challenged. Eventually, the Free Software movement formed and hijacked the copyright law in order to preserve the users’ freedoms, he said. He then compared the GPL with the French revolution and basic human rights in that the Free Software movement had a radical position and made the users’ rights explicit. Eventually, Free Software became successful, he said, mainly because software was becoming more successful in general. And, according to him, Free Software used to fill a gap that other software created in the 80s. Eventually, the last bastion to overcome was the desktop, he said, but then the Web happened which changed the landscape. New struggles are software patents, DRM, and privacy of the “bad services”. He, in my point of view rightfully so, said that all the proliferation of free and open source software, has not lead to less proprietary software though. Also, he is missing the original FOSS attitude and enthusiasm. Eventually he said that data is the new software. Data not was not an issue back when software, or Free Software even, started. He said that 99% of the US growth is coming from the data processing ad companies like Google or Facebook. Why does data have so much value, he asked. He said that actually living a human is a lot of work. Now you’re doing that labour for Facebook by entering the data of your human life into their system. That, he said, is where the value in coming from. He made the the point that Software Freedoms are irrelevant for data. He encouraged the hackers to think of information systems, not software. Although he left me wondering a bit how I could actually do that. All in all, a very inspiring talk. I’m happy that there is a (bad) recording online:

I visited probably the only private company in Cuba which doubles as a hackerspace. It’s interesting to see, because in my world, people go and work (on computer stuff) to make enough money to be free to become a singer, an author, or an artist. In Cuba it seems to be the other way around, people work in order to become computer professionals. My feeling is that many Cubans are quite artsy. There is music and dancing everywhere. Maybe it’s just the prospects of a rich life though. The average Cuban seems to make about 30USD a month. That’s surprising given that an hour of bad WiFi costs already 1 USD. A beer costs as much. I was told that everybody has their way to get hold of some more money. Very interesting indeed. Anyway, the people in the hackerspace seemed to be happy to offer their work across the globe. Their customers can be very happy, because these Cubans are a dedicated bunch of people. And they have competitive prices. Even if these specialists make only hundred times as much the average Cuban, they’d still be cheap in the so called developed world.

After having arrived back from Cuba, I went to the Rust Hackfest in Berlin. It was hosted by the nice Kinvolk folks and I enjoyed meeting all the hackers who care about making use of a safer language. I could continue my work on rustifying pixbuf loaders which will hopefully make it much harder to exploit them. Funnily enough, I didn’t manage to write a single line of Rust during the hackfest. But I expected that, because we need to get to code ready to be transformed to Rust first. More precisely, restructure it a bit so that it has explicit error codes instead of magic numbers. And because we’re parsing stuff, there are many magic numbers. While digging through the code, other bugs popped up as well which we needed to eliminate as side challenges. I’m looking much forward to writing an actual line of Rust soon!

Pascal Terjan: When faster WiFi means unusable connection

Hën, 04/12/2017 - 12:07md

I recently moved home and got FTTC with PlusNet, the speed is good when measuring (almost the advertised 80Mb/20Mb) but the connection was unusable due to TCP connections hanging every few minutes (very annoying with ssh but screen helps, worse when using a website for a payment and needing to retry and trust you will only be charged once).

Yesterday I decided to sit down and investigate. Router has logs which were quite helpful. A lot of things like OUT: BLOCK [9] Packet invalid in connection (Invalid tcp flags for current tcp state: TCP [192.168.1.73]:54426-​>[46.19.168.229]:443 on ppp3)

This followed the laptop being seen moving from interface ath10 to interface ath00 and it was moving back and forth quite often.

Looking at the logs on one of the laptops those switches looked like wlan0: disconnect from AP b8:d9:4d:41:76:fb for new auth to b8:d9:4d:41:76:fa

What happened is that default settings on PlusNet router is to have “identical” 2.4GHz and 5GHz networks so the devices believe they are the same network and switch between AP, but they are actually different and the connection tracking gets reset each time such switch happens.

Disabling the 5GHz network made my connection usable, I could probably just change its settings to make it separate.

Felipe Borges: Download and install operating systems directly in GNOME Boxes

Hën, 04/12/2017 - 11:39pd

If you are closely following the development of GNOME Boxes, you probably have read Debarshi’s announcement of this new feature that allows you to download and install Red Hat Enterprise Linux gratis directly from Boxes.

This time we are enabling you to install many other operating system virtual machines right from inside Boxes. A moving picture is better than words, so watch the preview below:

The list is populated by libosinfo, which gets updated shortly after every new OS release. If you don’t see your favorite distro there, please send us a patch.

This feature will feature GNOME 3.28.
Happy virtualization!

Tobias Mueller: Talking at GI Tracking Workshop in Darmstadt, Germany

Dje, 03/12/2017 - 5:09md

Uh, I almost forgot about blogging about having talked at the GI Tracking Workshop in Darmstadt, Germany. The GI is, literally translated, the “informatics society” and sort of a union of academics in the field of computer science (oh boy, I’ll probably get beaten up for that description). And within that body several working groups exist. And one of these groups working on privacy organised this workshop about tracking on the Web.

I consider “workshop” a bit of a misnomer for this event, because it was mainly talks with a panel at the end. I was an invited panellist for representing the Free Software movement contrasting a guy from affili.net, someone from eTracker.com, a lady from eyeo (the AdBlock Plus people), and professors representing academia. During the panel discussion I tried to focus on Free Software being the only tool to enable the user to exercise control over what data is being sent in order to control tracking. Nobody really disagreed, which made the discussion a bit boring for me. Maybe I should have tried to find another more controversial argument to make people say more interesting things. Then again, it’s probably more the job of the moderator to make the participants discuss heatedly. Anyway, we had a nice hour or so of talking about the future of tracking, not only the Web, but in our lives.

One of the speakers was Lars Konzelmann who works at Saxony’s data protection office. He talked about the legislative nature of data protection issues. The GDPR is, although being almost two years old, a thing now. Several types of EU-wide regulations exist, he said. One is “Regulation” and the other is “Directive”. The GDPR has been designed as a Regulation, because the EU wanted to keep a minimum level of quality across the EU and prevent countries to implement their own legislation with rather lax rules, he said. The GDPR favours “privacy by design” but that has issues, he said, as the usability aspects are severe. Because so far, companies can get the user’s “informed consent” in order to do pretty much anything they want. Although it’s usefulness is limited, he said, because people generally don’t understand what they are consenting to. But with the GDPR, companies should implement privacy by design which will probably obsolete the option for users to simply click “agree”, he said. So things will somehow get harder to agree to. That, in turn, may cause people to be unhappy and feel that they are being patronised and being told what they should do, rather than expressing their free will with a simple click of a button.

Next up was a guy with their solution against tracking in the Web. They sell a little box which you use to surf the Web with, similar to what Pi Hole provides. It’s a Raspberry Pi with a modified (and likely GPL infringing) modification of Raspbian which you plug into your network and use as a gateway. I assume that the device then filters your network traffic to exclude known bad trackers. Anyway, he said that ads are only the tip of the iceberg. Below that is your more private intimate sphere which is being pried on by real time bidding for your screen estate by advertising companies. Why would that be a problem, you ask. And he said that companies apply dynamic pricing depending on your profile and that you might well be interested in knowing that you are being treated worse than other people. Other examples include a worse credit- or health rating depending on where you browse or because your bank knows that you’re a gambler. In fact, micro targeting allows for building up a political profile of yours or to make identity theft much easier. He then went on to explain how Web tracking actually works. He mentioned third party cookies, “social” plugins (think: Like button), advertisement, content providers like Google Maps, Twitter, Youtube, these kind of things, as a means to track you. And that it’s possible to do non invasive customer recognition which does not involve writing anything to the user’s disk, e.g. no cookies. In fact, such a fingerprinting of the users’ browser is the new thing, he said. He probably knows, because he is also in the business of providing a tracker. That’s probably how he knows that “data management providers” (DMP) merge data sets of different trackers to get a more complete picture of the entity behind a tracking code. DMPs enrich their profiles by trading them with other DMPs. In order to match IDs, the tracker sends some code that makes the user’s browser merge the tracking IDs, e.g. make it send all IDs to all the trackers. He wasn’t really advertising his product, but during Q&A he was asked what we can do against that tracking behaviour and then he was forced to praise his product…

Eye/o’s legal counsel Judith Nink then talked about the juristic aspects of blocking advertisements. She explained why people use adblockers in first place. I commented on that before, claiming that using an adblocker improves your security. She did indeed mention privacy and security being reasons for people to run adblockers and explicitly mentionedmalvertising. She said that Jerusalem Post had ads which were actually malware. That in turn caused some stir-up in Germany, because it was coined as attack on German parliament… But other reasons for running and adblocker were data consumption and the speed of loading Web pages, she said. And, of course, the simple annoyance of certain advertisements. She presented some studies which showed that the typical Web site has 50+ or so trackers and that the costs of downloading advertising were significant compared to downloading the actual content. She then showed a statement by Edward Snowden saying that using an ad-blocker was not only a right but is a duty.

Everybody should be running adblock software, if only from a safety perspective

Browser based ad blockers need external filter lists, she said. The discussion then turned towards the legality of blocking ads. I wasn’t aware that it’s a thing that law people discuss. How can it possibly not be legal to control what my client does when being fed a bunch of HTML and JavaScript..? Turns out that it’s more about the entity offering these lists and a program to evaluate them *shrug*. Anyway, ad-blockers use either blocking or hiding of elements, she said where “blocking” is to stop the browser from issuing the request in first place while “hiding” is to issue the request, but to then hide the DOM element. Yeah, law people make exactly this distinction. She then turned to the question of how legal either of these behaviours is. To the non German folks that question may seem silly. And I tend to agree. But apparently, you cannot simply distribute software which modifies a Browser to either block requests or hide DOM elements without getting sued by publishers. Those, she said, argue that gratis content can only be delivered along with ads and that it’s part of the deal with the customer. Like that they also transfer ads along with the actual content. If you think that this is an insane argument, especially in light of the customer not having had the ability to review that deal before loading that page, you’re in good company. She argued, that the simple act of loading a page cannot be a statement of consent, let alone be a deal of some sorts. In order to make it a deal, the publishers would have to show their terms of service first, before showing anything, she said. Anyway, eye/o’s business is to provide those filter lists and a browser plugin to make use of those lists. If you pay them, however, they think twice before blocking your content and make exceptions. That feels a bit mafiaesque and so they were sued for “aggressive geschäftliche Handlung”, an “aggressive commercial behaviour”. I found the history of cases interesting, but I’ll spare the details for the reader here. You can follow that, and other cases, by looking at OLG Koeln 6U149/15.

Next up was Dominik Herrmann to present on PrivacyScore.org, a Web portal for scanning Web sites for security and privacy issues. It is similar to other scanners, he said, but the focus of PrivacyScore is publicity. By making results public, he hopes that a race to the top will occur. Web site operators might feel more inclined to implement certain privacy or security mechanisms if they know that they are the only Web site which doesn’t protect the privacy of their users. Similarly, users might opt to use a Web site providing a more privacy friendly service. With the public portal you can create lists in order to create public benchmarks. I took the liberty to create a list of Free Desktop environments. At the time of creation, GNOME fell behind many others, because the mail server did not implement TLS 1.2. I hope that is being taking as a motivational factor to make things more secure.

Michael Catanzaro: Product review: WASD V2 Keyboard

Pre, 01/12/2017 - 10:54md

A new blog on Planet GNOME often means an old necropost for us residents of the future to admire.

I, too, bought a custom keyboard from WASD. It is quite nice to be able to customize the printing using an SVG file. Yes, my keyboard has GNOME feet on the super keys, and a Dvorak layout, and, oh yes, Cantarell font. Yes, Cantarell was silly, and yes, it means bad kerning, but it is kind of cool to know I’m probably the only person on the planet to have a Cantarell keyboard.

It was nice for a little under one year. Then I noticed that the UV printing on some of the keys was beginning to wear off. WASD lets you purchase individual keycaps at a reasonable price, and I availed myself of that option for a couple keys that needed it, and then a couple more. But now some of the replacement keycaps need to be replaced, and I’ve owned the keyboard for just over a year and a half. It only makes sense to purchase a product this expensive if it’s going to last.

I discovered that MAX Keyboard offers custom keyboard printing using SVG files, and their keycaps are compatible with WASD. I guess it’s a clone of WASD’s service, because I’ve never heard of MAX before, but I don’t actually know which came first. Anyway, you can buy just the keycaps without the keyboard, for a reasonable price. But they apparently use a UV printing process, which is what WASD does, so I have no clue if MAX will hold up any better or not. I decided not to purchase it. (At least, not now. Who knows what silly things I might do in the future.) Instead, I purchased a blank PBT keycap set from them. It arrived yesterday, and it seems nice. It’s a slightly different shade of black than WASD’s keycaps, but that’s OK. Hopefully these will hold up better, and I won’t need to replace the entire keyboard. And hopefully I don’t find I need to look at the keys to find special characters or irregularly-used functions like PrintScreen and media keys. We’ll see.

Hans Petter Jansson: GNOME and Rust

Pre, 01/12/2017 - 11:52pd

I’ve been keeping an eye on Rust for a while now, so when I read Alberto’s statement of support for more Rust use in GNOME, I couldn’t resist piling on…

From the perspective of someone who’s quite used to C, it does indeed seem to tick all the boxes. High performance, suitability for low-level tasks and C ABI compatibility tend to be sticking points with new languages — and Rust kills it in those departments. Anyone who needs further convincing should read up on Raph Levien’s font renderer. The usual caveat about details vis-a-vis the Devil applies, but the general idea looks exactly right. Rust’s expressiveness and lack of baggage means it could even outperform C for non-trivial code, on top of all the other advantages.

There are risks too, of course. I’d worry about adoption, growth and the availability of bindings/libraries/other features, like a good optional GC for high-level apps (there is at least one in the works, but it doesn’t seem to be quite ready for prime-time yet). Rust is on an upwards trajectory, and there doesn’t seem to be many tasks where it’s eminently unsuitable, so in theory, it could have a wide reach: operating systems, platform libraries, both client- and server-side applications, games and so on. However, it doesn’t appear to be the de facto language in many contexts yet. Consider the statement “If I learn language X, I will then be able to work on Y.” Substitute for X: Java, Javascript, Python, ObjC, C, C++, C# or even Visual Basic — and Y becomes obvious. How does Rust fare?

That is, of course, a very conservative argument, while in my mind the GNOME project represents, for better or worse, and C use notwithstanding, a more radical F/OSS philosophy. Its founding was essentially formulated as a revolt against the Qt license (and a limited choice of programming languages!), it was an early adopter of Git for version control, and it’s a driver for Wayland and Flatpak now. For what it’s worth, speaking as mostly a downstream integrator, I wouldn’t mind it if GNOME embraced its DNA yet again and fully opened the door to Rust.

Hans Petter Jansson: New toy

Pre, 01/12/2017 - 11:52pd

I got a new toy. It’s a WASD keyboard with Cherry MX Clear switches. The picture doesn’t do it justice; maybe I should’ve gotten a new camera instead… I guess it’ll have to wait.

Mechanical-switch keyboards are pricey, but since I spend more than 2000 hours a year in front of a keyboard, it’s not a bad investment. Or so I’m telling myself. Anyway, it’s a big step up from the rubber dome one I’ve been using for the past couple of years. The key travel is longer, and it’s nice to have proper tactile feedback. Since the Clear switches have stiff springs, I can also rest my fingers on the keys when daydreamingthinking. It has anti-slip pads underneath, so it stays put, and it doesn’t bounce or rattle at all.

Until our last move, I clung to an older, clicky keyboard (I don’t remember which brand — I thought it was Key Tronic, but I’ve a hard time finding any clicky keyboards of theirs at the moment), worried that the future held rubber dome and chiclets only — but today, there are lots of options if you look around. I guess we have mostly gamers and aficionados to thank for that. So thank you, gamers and aficionados.

I did plenty of research beforehand, but WASD finally drew me in with this little detail: They have some very well thought-out editable layout templates for SodipodiInkscape. Good taste in software there.

Daniel Espinosa: Large number of XML Nodes and GXml performance

Enj, 30/11/2017 - 2:09pd

GXml performance has been improved since initial releases.

First implementation parse all to libxml2 tree and then to a GObject set of classes, in order to provide GObject Serialization framework.

Over time GXmlGom was added as a set of classes avoiding to use libxml2 tree improving both memory and performance on Serialization.

GXml has been used in many applications like parse Electrical Substation Configuration Language files by librescl.org; to Mexican Tax Authority XML invoices format, among others.

QRSVG Performance

For my private projects, I need to create QR of size 61×61 = 3721 squares. This means at least 2700 XML nodes. This is a large number of nodes and because QRSVG depends on GSVG and it depends on GXml, all them depend on GXml’s implementation for performance.

Initial measurements suggest that, at no surprise, using a simple array of objects takes up to 0.5 seconds to add just a node, as maximum time measured.

So GXml’s implementation should be improved for large number of nodes. Now it uses Gee.ArrayList, is clean and easy to wrap a node list implementing W3C DOM4 API. But now I’m considering to use Gee.TreeMap, because it is designed for large collection of objects, from its documentation:

This implementation is especially well designed for large quantity of data. The (balanced) tree implementation insure that the set and get methods are in logarithmic complexity.

The problem is its Map interface, where I need to implement a Gee.BidirList interface over it, in order to ensure fit in W3C DOM4 API and get performance boost.

Lets see how evolves this. Any suggestion?

Ismael Olea: So we are working in new conferences for 2018

Mër, 29/11/2017 - 4:37md

Well, now we can say here (Almería, Spain) we know something about how to do technical conferences and meetings, specially opensource/freesoftware ones. In 2016 and 2017 we co-organized:

And we are really grateful to those people and communities who trusted us to be their host for some days. The reunited experience aimed us to new challenges. So here I just want to share in which conferences I’m currently involved for 2018:

  • SuperSEC 2018, a national (Spain) conference on secure software development, in the orbit of OWASP, to be held in next May. And we are almost ready to open the CFP!

  • GUADEC 2018, the European conference for the GNOME et al. community, from 6 to 11th of July.

But we want mooar, so we are currently biding to host Flock 2018, the annual meeting for the Fedora Project community

Our goal is to host both sister conferences one just after the other, so a lot of people could attend both saving good money.

So, if you are a contributor of any of those communities or just an opensource enthusiast consider this extraordinaire opportunity to match your summer holidays in a nice place for tourism and the July 2018 opensource world meeting point!

Wish us luck :-)

PD: Just updated the definitive dates for GUADEC 2018.

Jiri Eischmann: Fedora Media Writer Available in Flathub

Mër, 29/11/2017 - 1:54md

Fedora Media Writer is the tool to create live USB flash drives with Fedora. You can also use dd or GNOME Disks, but Fedora Media Writer is the only graphical tool that is tested with Fedora ISOs (please don’t use UNetbootin and such because they really cause faulty Fedora installations).

Fedora Media Writer is available as an RPM package in Fedora repositories and we provide installation files for Windows and macOS. Those are actually offered to users with Windows and macOS as the default download options at getfedora.org. We’ve provided users of other Linux distributions with a flatpak, but it was hosted in its own repo. Recently we managed to get the flatpak to Flathub which many users have already enabled, so now it’s even easier and faster to install.


Pranav Kant: Dialog Tunnelling

Mër, 29/11/2017 - 9:53pd

So I’m finally resurrecting this blog to life after a long time.

I’m simply going to talk about what I’ve been currently working on in Collabora Online or LibreOffice Online, as part of my job at Collabora.

In our quest to bring more features available to our users editing documents in the browser, we are attacking something that contains the majority of the features in LibreOffice – the dialogs. One of the complaints that power users make in Online is that it lacks advanced features: they cannot add coloured borders in their paragraphs, manage tracked changes/comments, correct the spelling and grammar in the document, etc. The question before us is how do we bring these functionalities to the cloud at your disposal in your browser tab?

We really don’t want to write another million lines of code in Javascript to make them available in your browser and then dealing with separate set of bugs for time to come.

So we decided to come up with a plan to just tunnel all the hard work that developers have done for the past couple of decades: come up with appropriate infrastructure to open the dialog in headless mode, paint them as a bitmap in the backend, and tunnel then image to you in the browser. And then add life to them by tunnelling your mouse/key events as well which will invalidate and update the new image you are seeing the browser. Don’t worry; we are not sending the whole dialog image back to your browser every time. Only the part that needs updating in the dialog is sent back to the browser saving us precious time and network bandwidth improving your UX.

The current state of the project looks really promising. Not just the modeless dialogs, we are able to tunnel the modal ones as well which is not something we had expected earlier.

Since text is boring, here’s a preview that shows dialog tunnelling in action in our test tools, GtkTiledViewer. The integration with Online is ready too and undergoing some final polishing. But it’s not something you’d have to wait for too long; we are polishing a big refactor to LibreOffice core master to install the dialog infrastructure needed for integration. Now you will be able to do pretty much all the things in Online (and in CODE version 3.0 soon to be released) that you’ve always wanted to do.

Here are the slides from the talk I delivered on the same topic in our annual LibreOffice Conference in Rome this year.

Pranav Kant: Dialog Tunnelling in Collabora Online

Mër, 29/11/2017 - 7:54pd

So I’m finally resurrecting this blog to life after a long time.

I’m simply going to talk about what I’ve been currently working on in Collabora Online or LibreOffice Online, as part of my job at Collabora.

In our quest to bring more features available to our users editing documents in the browser, we are attacking something that contains the majority of the features in LibreOffice – the dialogs. One of the complaints that power users make in Online is that it lacks advanced features: they cannot add coloured borders in their paragraphs, manage tracked changes/comments, correct the spelling and grammar in the document, etc. The question before us is how do we bring these functionalities to the cloud at your disposal in your browser tab?

We really don’t want to write another million lines of code in Javascript to make them available in your browser and then dealing with separate set of bugs for time to come.

So we decided to come up with a plan to just tunnel all the hard work that developers have done for the past couple of decades: come up with appropriate infrastructure to open the dialog in headless mode, paint them as a bitmap in the backend, and tunnel then image to you in the browser. And then add life to them by tunnelling your mouse/key events as well which will invalidate and update the new image you are seeing the browser. Don’t worry; we are not sending the whole dialog image back to your browser every time. Only the part that needs updating in the dialog is sent back to the browser saving us precious time and network bandwidth improving your UX.

The current state of the project looks really promising. Not just the modeless dialogs, we are able to tunnel the modal ones as well which is not something we had expected earlier.

Since text is boring, here’s a preview that shows dialog tunnelling in action in our test tools, GtkTiledViewer. The integration with Online is ready too and undergoing some final polishing. But it’s not something you’d have to wait for too long. Now you will be able to do pretty much all the things that you’ve always wanted to do.

Here are the slides from the talk I delivered on the same topic in our annual LibreOffice Conference in Rome this year.

Faqet