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Dude! Sweet! joey Reproducible builds blog jmtd "Passion and dispassion. Choose two." -- Larry Wall Free Software Indie Hacker jmtd Debian and Free Software WEBlog -- Wouter's Eclectic Blog rebel with rather too many causes jmtd Debian and Free Software WEBlog -- Wouter's Eclectic Blog liw's English language blog feed random musings and comments Any sufficiently advanced thinking is indistinguishable from madness Ben Hutchings's diary of life and technology random musings and comments Thinking inside the box rebel with rather too many causes ral-arturo blog, about free software, debian, networks, systems, or whatever random musings and comments Dude! Sweet! Linux, politics, and other interesting things random musings and comments Thinking inside the box Matthew Garrett - Dreamwidth Studios Reproducible builds blog a blog liw's English language blog feed random musings and comments something around Debian, written in funny Eng"r"ish ;) Blog from the Debian Project Linux, politics, and other interesting things joey Linux, politics, and other interesting things pabs If you can't find the time to do it right the first time, where are you going to find the time to do it over? ganbatte kudasai! How to recognise different types of trees ganbatte kudasai! Dude! Sweet! Any sufficiently advanced thinking is indistinguishable from madness Debian and Free Software Random musings about Free/Libre/Open Source Software - and also about Linux and the way that the world is, gadgets and trends Reproducible builds blog
Përditësimi: 3 ditë 2 orë më parë

Debian LTS work, August 2018

Enj, 13/09/2018 - 1:54md

I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 8 hours from July. I worked only 5 hours and therefore carried over 18 hours to September.

I prepared and uploaded updates to the linux-4.9 (DLA 1466-1, DLA 1481-1) and linux-latest-4.9 packages.

Ben Hutchings https://www.decadent.org.uk/ben/blog Better living through software

TeX Live contrib updates

Enj, 13/09/2018 - 4:56pd

It is now more than a year that I took over tlcontrib from Taco and provide it at the TeX Live contrib repository. It does now serve old TeX Live 2017 as well as the current TeX Live 2018, and since last year the number of packages has increased from 52 to 70.

Recent changes include pTeX support packages for non-free fonts and more packages from the AcroTeX bundle. In particular since the last post the following packages have been added: aeb-mobile, aeb-tilebg, aebenvelope, cjk-gs-integrate-macos, comicsans, datepicker-pro, digicap-pro, dps, eq-save, fetchbibpes, japanese-otf-nonfree, japanese-otf-uptex-nonfree, mkstmpdad, opacity-pro, ptex-fontmaps-macos, qrcstamps.

Here I want to thank Jürgen Gilg for reminding me consistently of updates I have missed, big thanks!

To recall what TLcontrib is for: It collects packages that not distributed inside TeX Live proper for one or another of the following reasons:

  • because it is not free software according to the FSF guidelines;
  • because it is an executable update;
  • because it is not available on CTAN;
  • because it is an intermediate release for testing.

In short, anything related to TeX that can not be on TeX Live but can still legally be distributed over the Internet can have a place on TLContrib. The full list of packages can be seen here.

Please see the main page for Quickstart, History, and details about how to contribute packages.

Last but not least, while this is a service to make access to non-free packages more easy for users of the TeX Live Manager, our aim is to have as many as possible packages made completely free and included into TeX Live proper!

Enjoy.

Norbert Preining https://www.preining.info/blog There and back again

digest 0.6.17

Enj, 13/09/2018 - 2:06pd

digest version 0.6.17 arrived on CRAN earlier today after a day of gestation in the bowels of CRAN, and should get uploaded to Debian in due course.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64 and murmur32 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects.

This release brings another robustifications thanks to Radford Neal who noticed a segfault in 32 bit mode on Sparc running Solaris. Yay for esoteric setups. But thanks to his very nice pull request, this is taken care of, and it also squashed one UBSAN error under the standard gcc setup. But two files remain with UBSAN issues, help would be welcome!

CRANberries provides the usual summary of changes to the previous version.

For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Dirk Eddelbuettel http://dirk.eddelbuettel.com/blog Thinking inside the box

Disappointment on the new commute

Mër, 12/09/2018 - 6:53md

Imagine my disappointment when I discovered that signs on Stanford’s campus pointing to their “Enchanted Broccoli Forest” and “Narnia”—both of which that I have been passing daily on my new commute—merely indicate the location of student living groups with whimsical names.

Benjamin Mako Hill https://mako.cc/copyrighteous copyrighteous

Distributing static routes with DHCP

Mër, 12/09/2018 - 10:00pd

This week I had to deal with a setup in which I needed to distribute additional static network routes using DHCP.

The setup is easy but there are some caveats to take into account. Also, DHCP clients might not behave as one would expect.

The starting situation was a working DHCP clinet/server deployment. Some standard virtual machines would request for their network setup over the network. Nothing new. The DHCP server is dnsmasq, and the daemon is running under Openstack control, but this has nothing to do with the DHCP problem itself.

By default, it seems dnsmasq sends to clients the Routers (code 3) option, which usually contains the gateway for clients in the subnet to use. My situation required to distribute one additional static route for another subnet. My idea was for DHCP clients to end with this simple routing table:

user@dhcpclient:~$ ip r default via 10.0.0.1 dev eth0 10.0.0.0/24 dev eth0 proto kernel scope link src 10.0.0.100 172.16.0.0/21 via 10.0.0.253 dev eth0 <--- extra static route

To distribute this extra static route, you only need to edit the dnsmasq config file and add a line like this:

dhcp-option=option:classless-static-route,172.16.0.0/21,10.0.0.253

For my initial tests of this config I was simply doing requesting to refresh the lease from the client DHCP. This got my new static route online, but if in the case of a reboot, the client DHCP would not get the default route. The different behaviour is documented in dhclient-script(8).

To try something similar to a reboot situation, I had to use this command:

user@dhcpclient:~$ sudo ifup --force eth0 Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Client 4.3.1 Copyright 2004-2014 Internet Systems Consortium. All rights reserved. For info, please visit https://www.isc.org/software/dhcp/ Listening on LPF/eth0/xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx Sending on LPF/eth0/xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx Sending on Socket/fallback DHCPREQUEST on eth0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 DHCPACK from 10.0.0.1 RTNETLINK answers: File exists bound to 10.0.0.100 -- renewal in 20284 seconds.

Anyway this was really surprissing at first, and led me to debug DHCP packets using dhcpdump:

TIME: 2018-09-11 18:06:03.496 IP: 10.0.0.1 (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx) > 10.0.0.100 (xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx) OP: 2 (BOOTPREPLY) HTYPE: 1 (Ethernet) HLEN: 6 HOPS: 0 XID: xxxxxxxx SECS: 8 FLAGS: 0 CIADDR: 0.0.0.0 YIADDR: 10.0.0.100 SIADDR: xx.xx.xx.x GIADDR: 0.0.0.0 CHADDR: xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00 OPTION: 53 ( 1) DHCP message type 2 (DHCPOFFER) OPTION: 54 ( 4) Server identifier 10.0.0.1 OPTION: 51 ( 4) IP address leasetime 43200 (12h) OPTION: 58 ( 4) T1 21600 (6h) OPTION: 59 ( 4) T2 37800 (10h30m) OPTION: 1 ( 4) Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 OPTION: 28 ( 4) Broadcast address 10.0.0.255 OPTION: 15 ( 13) Domainname xxxxxxxx OPTION: 12 ( 21) Host name xxxxxxxx OPTION: 3 ( 4) Routers 10.0.0.1 OPTION: 121 ( 8) Classless Static Route xxxxxxxxxxxxxx .....D.. [...] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

(you can use this handy command both in server and client side)

So, the DHCP server was sending both the Routers (code 3) and the Classless Static Route (code 121) options to the clients. So, why would fail the client to install both routes?

I obtained some help from folks on IRC and they pointed me towards RFC3442:

DHCP Client Behavior [...] If the DHCP server returns both a Classless Static Routes option and a Router option, the DHCP client MUST ignore the Router option.

So, clients are supposed to ignore the Routers (code 3) option if they get an additional static route. This is very counter-intuitive, but can be easily workarounded by just distributing the default gateway route as another classless static route:

dhcp-option=option:classless-static-route,0.0.0.0/0,10.0.0.1,172.16.0.0/21,10.0.0.253 # ^^ default route ^^ extra static route

Obviously this was my first time in my career dealing with this setup and situation. My conclussion is that even old-enough protocols like DHCP can sometimes behave in a counter-intuitive way. Reading RFCs is not always funny, but can help understand what’s going on.

You can read the original issue in Wikimedia Foundation’s Phabricator ticket T202636, including all the back-and-forth work I did. Yes, is open to the public ;-)

Arturo Borrero González http://ral-arturo.org/ ral-arturo.org

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