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Stephen Kelly: Composing AST Matchers in clang-tidy

Planet Ubuntu - Mar, 20/11/2018 - 10:16pd

When creating clang-tidy checks, it is common to extract parts of AST Matcher expressions to local variables. I expanded on this in a previous blog.

auto nonAwesomeFunction = functionDecl( unless(matchesName("^::awesome_")) ); Finder->addMatcher( nonAwesomeFunction.bind("addAwesomePrefix") , this); Finder->addMatcher( callExpr(callee(nonAwesomeFunction)).bind("addAwesomePrefix") , this);

Use of such variables establishes an emergent extension API for re-use in the checks, or in multiple checks you create which share matcher requirements.

When attempting to match items inside a ForStmt for example, we might encounter the difference in the AST depending on whether braces are used or not.

#include <vector> void foo() { std::vector<int> vec; int c = 0; for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) vec.push_back(i); for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) { vec.push_back(i); } }

In this case, we wish to match the push_back method inside a ForStmt body. The body item might be a CompoundStmt or the CallExpr we wish to match. We can match both cases with the anyOf matcher.

auto pushbackcall = callExpr(callee(functionDecl(hasName("push_back")))); Finder->addMatcher( forStmt( hasBody(anyOf( pushbackcall.bind("port_call"), compoundStmt(has(pushbackcall.bind("port_call"))) )) ) , this);

Having to list the pushbackcall twice in the matcher is suboptimal. We ca do better by defining a new API function which we can use in AST Matcher expressions:

auto hasIgnoringBraces = [](auto const& Matcher) { return anyOf( Matcher, compoundStmt(has(Matcher)) ); };

With this in hand, we can simplify the original expression:

auto pushbackcall = callExpr(callee(functionDecl(hasName("push_back")))); Finder->addMatcher( forStmt( hasBody(hasIgnoringBraces( pushbackcall.bind("port_call") )) ) , this);

This pattern of defining AST Matcher API using a lambda function finds use in other contexts. For example, sometimes we want to find and bind to an AST node if it is present, ignoring its absense if is not present.

For example, consider wishing to match struct declarations and match a copy constructor if present:

struct A { }; struct B { B(B const&); };

We can match the AST with the anyOf() and anything() matchers.

Finder->addMatcher( cxxRecordDecl(anyOf( hasMethod(cxxConstructorDecl(isCopyConstructor()).bind("port_method")), anything() )).bind("port_record") , this);

This can be generalized into an optional() matcher:

auto optional = [](auto const& Matcher) { return anyOf( Matcher, anything() ); };

The anything() matcher matches, well, anything. It can also match nothing because of the fact that a matcher written inside another matcher matches itself.

That is, matchers such as

functionDecl(decl()) functionDecl(namedDecl()) functionDecl(functionDecl())

match ‘trivially’.

If a functionDecl() in fact binds to a method, then the derived type can be used in the matcher:

functionDecl(cxxMethodDecl())

The optional matcher can be used as expected:

Finder->addMatcher( cxxRecordDecl( optional( hasMethod(cxxConstructorDecl(isCopyConstructor()).bind("port_method")) ) ).bind("port_record") , this);

Yet another problem writers of clang-tidy checks will find is that AST nodes CallExpr and CXXConstructExpr do not share a common base representing the ability to take expressions as arguments. This means that separate matchers are required for calls and constructions.

Again, we can solve this problem generically by creating a composition function:

auto callOrConstruct = [](auto const& Matcher) { return expr(anyOf( callExpr(Matcher), cxxConstructExpr(Matcher) )); };

which reads as ‘an Expression which is any of a call expression or a construct expression’.

It can be used in place of either in matcher expressions:

Finder->addMatcher( callOrConstruct( hasArgument(0, integerLiteral().bind("port_literal")) ) , this);

Creating composition functions like this is a very convenient way to simplify and create maintainable matchers in your clang-tidy checks. A recently published RFC on the topic of making clang-tidy checks easier to write proposes some other conveniences which can be implemented in this manner.

Stephen Michael Kellat: Hitting a Break Point

Planet Ubuntu - Mar, 20/11/2018 - 3:55pd

Well, I had a weekend off sick. The time has come to put things in motion. Health concerns pushed up my timetable for what was discussed prior.

I am seeking support to be able to undertake freelance work. The first project would be to finally close out the Outernet/Othernet research work to get it submitted. Beyond that there would be technical writing as well as making creative works. Some of that would involve creating “digital library” collections but also helping others create print works instead.

Who could I help/serve? Unfortunately we have plenty of small, underfunded groups in my town. The American Red Cross no longer maintains a local office and the Salvation Army has no staff presence locally. Our county-owned airport verges on financial collapse and multiple units of government have difficulty staying solvent. There are plenty of needs to cover as long as someone had independent financial backing.

Besides, I owe some edits of Xubuntu documentation too.

It isn’t like “going on disability” as it is called in American parlance is immediate let alone simple. One of two sets of paperwork has to eventually go into a cave in Pennsylvania for centralized processing. I wish I were kidding but that cave is located near Slippery Rock. Both processes are backlogged only 12-18 months at last report. For making a change in the short term, that doesn’t even exist as an option on the table.

That’s why I’m asking for support. I’ve grown tired of spending multiple days at work depressed. Showing physical symptoms of depression in the workplace isn’t good either especially when it results in me missing work. When you can’t help people who are in the throes of despair frequently by their own fault, how much more futile can it get?

I set the goal on Liberapay lower than what I get now. While it would be a pay cut, I’d still be able to pay the bills. It is time to move to doing something constructive for society instead of merely fueling the machinery of government. For as often as I get asked how I sleep at night, I want to move past the answer being “terribly”.

The relevant Liberapay page is here. Folks like Pepper & Carrot use it. If the goal can be initially met by December 7th, I would be ready for the potential budget snafu at work like the three we already had at the start of the year.

I just look forward to some day being able to talk about doing good things instead of having to be cryptic due to security restrictions.

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 554

Planet Ubuntu - Hën, 19/11/2018 - 11:18md

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 554 for the week of November 11 – 17, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Krytarik Raido
  • Bashing-om
  • Chris Guiver
  • Wild Man
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, this issue of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 License

Rodrigo Siqueira: An attempt to create a local Kernel community

Planet Debian - Hën, 19/11/2018 - 3:00pd

Since the day I had my first class of Operating Systems (OS) in my engineering course, I got passionate about it; for me, OS represents one of the greatest achievements of mankind. As a result of my delight for OS, I always tried to gravitate around this field, but my school environment did not provide me with many opportunities to get into the area. To summarize this long journey, I will jump directly into the main point, on November 15 of 2017, I joined to a conference named Linuxdev-br [1] which brought together some of the best Brazilians Kernel developers. I took this opportunity to learn everything that I could by asking lots of questions to developers. Additionally, I was lucky to meet Gustavo Padovan. He helped me a lot during my first steps in the Linux Kernel.

From November 2017 until now, I did the best I could to become a Kernel developer, and I have to admit that the path was very complicated. I paid the price to work from 8 AM to 11 PM, from Sunday to Sunday, to maintain my efforts in my master and the Linux Kernel at the same time; unfortunately, I could not stay focused only in the Kernel. However, all of these efforts were paid off along the year; I had many patches accepted in the Kernel, I joined the Google Summer of Code (GSoC), I traveled to conferences, I returned to Linuxdev-br 2018 as a speaker, I joined XDC2018 [2], and many other good things happened.

Now I am close to complete one year of Linux Kernel, and one question still bugs me: why does it have to be so hard for someone in a similar condition to become part of this world? I realized that I had great support from many people (especially from my sweet and calm wife) and I also pushed myself very hard. Now, I feel that it is time to start giving back something to society; as a result, I began to promote some small events about free software in the university and the city I live. However, my main project related to this started around two months ago with six undergraduate students at the University of Sao Paulo, IME [3]. My plan is simple: train all of these six students to contribute to the Linux Kernel with the intention to help them to create a local group of Kernel developers. I am excited about this project! I noticed that within a few weeks of mentoring the students they already learned lots of things, and in a few days, they will send out their contributions to the Kernel. I want to write a new post about that in December 2018, reporting the results of this new tiny project and the summary of this one year of Linux Kernel. See you soon :)

Reference
  1. linuxdev-br
  2. XDC 2018
  3. IME USP

Tiago Carrondo: S01E11 – Alta Coltura

Planet Ubuntu - Hën, 19/11/2018 - 12:32pd

Esta semana o trio maravilha dedicou a sua atenção a sugestões de leitura, técnica ou não, porque a vida não são só podcasts… As novidades no mundo SolusOS, a parceria da Canonical e da Samsung e o projecto Linux on Dex, sem esquecer a Festa do Software Livre da Moita 2018, que está já aí! Já sabes: Ouve, subscreve e partilha!

Patrocínios

Este episódio foi produzido e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço (Thunderclaws Studios – captação, produção, edição, mistura e masterização de som) contacto: thunderclawstudiosPT–arroba–gmail.com.

Atribuição e licenças

A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da CC0 1.0 Universal License.

Este episódio está licenciado nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização.

Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #115

Planet Ubuntu - Dje, 18/11/2018 - 6:01md

Open Source Software: 20-Plus Years of Innovation
Source: https://www.linuxinsider.com/story/Open-Source-Software-20-Plus-Years-of-Innovation-85646.html

IBM Buys Linux & Open Source Software Distributor Red Hat For $34 Billion
Source: https://fossbytes.com/ibm-buys-red-hat-open-source-linux/

We (may) now know the real reason for that IBM takeover. A distraction for Red Hat to axe KDE
Source: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/11/02/rhel_deprecates_kde/

Ubuntu Founder Mark Shuttleworth Has No Plans Of Selling Canonical
Source: https://fossbytes.com/ubuntu-founder-mark-shuttleworth-has-no-plans-of-selling-canonical/

Mark Shuttleworth reveals Ubuntu 18.04 will get a 10-year support lifespan
Source: https://www.zdnet.com/article/mark-shuttleworth-reveals-ubuntu-18-04-will-get-a-10-year-support-lifespan/

Debian GNU/Linux 9.6 “Stretch” Released with Hundreds of Updates
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/debian-gnu-linux-9-6-stretch-released-with-hundreds-of-updates-download-now-523739.shtml

Fresh Linux Mint 19.1 Arrives This Christmas
Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangelho/2018/11/01/fresh-linux-mint-19-1-arrives-this-christmas/#6c64618d293d

Linux-friendly company System76 shares more open source Thelio computer details
Source: https://betanews.com/2018/10/26/system76-open-source-thelio-linux/

Linus Torvalds Says Linux 5.0 Comes in 2019, Kicks Off Development of Linux 4.20
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/linus-torvalds-is-back-kicks-off-the-development-of-linux-kernel-4-20-523622.shtml

Canonical Adds Spectre V4, SpectreRSB Fixes to New Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Azure Kernel
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/canonical-adds-spectre-v4-spectrersb-fixes-to-new-ubuntu-18-04-lts-azure-kernel-523533.shtml

Trivial Bug in X.Org Gives Root Permission on Linux and BSD Systems
Source: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/trivial-bug-in-xorg-gives-root-permission-on-linux-and-bsd-systems/

Security Researcher Drops VirtualBox Guest-to-Host Escape Zero-Day on GitHub
Source: https://news.softpedia.com/news/security-researcher-drops-virtualbox-guest-to-host-escape-zero-day-on-github-523660.shtml

Another ActivityPub quirk

Planet Debian - Sht, 17/11/2018 - 11:44md

I’m wondering now if the problem with the activitypub is because the user object was already in the remote site and somehow the two were not being linked up properly.

Removing the user information off the mastodn instance may help, or not.

Craig https://dropbear.xyz Small Dropbear

activitypub 4

Planet Debian - Sht, 17/11/2018 - 11:13md

4th attempt at getitng the linking working, works ok on the test site now!

Craig https://dropbear.xyz Small Dropbear

Using libgps instead of libQgpsmm within a Qt application

Planet Debian - Sht, 17/11/2018 - 8:12md
I was in need of creating a Qt application using current Debian stable (Stretch) and gpsd. I could have used libQgpsmm which creates a QTcpSocket for stablishing the connection to the gpsd daemon. But then I hit an issue: libQgpsmm was switched to Qt 5 after the Strech release, namely in gpsd 3.17-4. And I'm using Qt 5.

So the next thing to do is to use libgps itself, which is written in C. In this case one needs to call gps_open() to open a connection, gps_stream() to ask for the needed stream... and use gps_waiting() to poll the socket for data.

gps_waiting() checks for data for a maximum of time specified in it's parameters. That means I would need to create a QTimer and poll it to get the data. Poll it fast enough for the application to be responsive, but not too excessively to avoid useless CPU cycles.

I did not like this idea, so I started digging gpsd's code until I found that it exposes the socket it uses in it's base struct, struct gps_data_t's gps_fd. So the next step was to set up a QSocketNotifier around it, and use it's activated() signal.

So (very) basically:

// Class private:
struct gps_data_t mGpsData;
QSocketNotifier * mNotifier;

// In the implementation:
result = gps_open("localhost", DEFAULT_GPSD_PORT, &mGpsData);
// [...check result status...]

result = gps_stream(&mGPSData,WATCH_ENABLE|WATCH_JSON, NULL);
// [...check result status...]

//  Set up the QSocketNotifier instance.
mNotifier = new QSocketNotifier(mGpsData.gps_fd, QSocketNotifier::Read, this); 

connect(mNotifier, &QSocketNotifier::activated, this, &MyGps::readData);

And of course, calling gps_read(&mGpsData) in MyGps::readData(). With this every time there is activity on the socket readData() will be called, an no need to set up a timer anymore. Lisandro Damián Nicanor Pérez Meyer noreply@blogger.com Solo sé que sé querer, que tengo Dios y tengo fe.

RcppGetconf 0.0.3

Planet Debian - Sht, 17/11/2018 - 1:23pd

A second and minor update for the RcppGetconf package for reading system configuration — not unlike getconf from the libc library — is now on CRAN.

Changes are minor. We avoid an error on a long-dead operating system cherished in one particular corner of the CRAN world. In doing so some files were updated so that dynamically loaded routines are now registered too.

The short list of changes in this release follows:

Changes in inline version 0.0.3 (2018-11-16)
  • Examples no longer run on Solaris where they appear to fail.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a diffstat report. More about the package is at the local RcppGetconf page and the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Dirk Eddelbuettel http://dirk.eddelbuettel.com/blog Thinking inside the box

How to measure learning outcomes ? The learner and the Cynic

Planet Debian - Pre, 16/11/2018 - 4:38md

I have been having a series of strange dreams for few days now. I had seen a bollywood movie called Sui-Dhaaga few days back .

The story is an improbable, semi-plausible story of a person, couple, no a community’s search for self-respect and dignity in labor. While the clothes shown in the movie at the fashion show were shown to be made by them, the styles seemed pretty much reminiscent of the materials and styles used by National Institute of Design.

One of the first dreams I had were of being in some sort of bare foot Design school which is/was interdisciplinary in nature. I am the bored guy who is there because he has no other skills and have been pressured by parents and well-wishers to do the course and even failed in that. I have been observing a guy who is always cleaner than the rest of us, always has a smile on his face and is content and enjoys working with cloth, whether it is tailoring or anything and everything to do with cloth. The material used is organic handspun Khadi which is mixed with silk to lose the coarseness and harshness that handspun Khadi has but using the least of chemicals and additives and is being sold at very low prices so that even a poor person can afford it.

This in reality is still a distant dream.

Anyways, with that as a backgrounder to the story, one day there is a class picnic/short travel. Because the picnic is ‘free’ i.e. paid by the Institute , almost everybody else except the gentleman who is always smiling and content agrees and wants to go to the picnic. The gentleman asks that he would prefer to be there in the classroom, studying and working with the cloth.

The lone teacher/management is in a fix. While he knows the student and doesn’t question his sincerity he is in a fix because the whole class/school is going for the picnic and there are expensive machines, material lying around. Even the watchmen want to be on the picnic and the teacher/management doesn’t have the heart to say no to them.

He asks in a sort of dejected voice if somebody wants to stay behind with him. A part of me wants to go to the picnic, a part of me wants to stay behind and if possible learn about the person’s mystery of his smile and contentedness.

After awaiting appropriate time and teacher asking couple of times, I take on a bored, resigned tone and volunteer to stay behind, provided I get some of the sweets and any clothes or whatever is distributed.

The next day, I wear one of my lesser shabbier clothes and go to school and find him near the gates of the school, at a nearby chai shop/tapri. He asks me how I am and asks if I would like to eat and drink something. I quickly order 3-4 items and after a fullish breakfast ended by a sweet masala chai we go to the school.

The ‘school’ is nothing but a two rooms with two adjacent toilets, one for men, one for women. The school is probably 500 meters squarish spaced with one corner for embroidery works, one corner for dyeing works, one corner for handspunning khadi and one corner which has tailoring machines. Just last year we had painted the walls of the school using organic colors and the year before we had some students come in who helped us in having more natural light and air to the school.

We also had a new/old water pump which after a long fight with the local councillor we had been able to get and got running water of sorts. We went to the loo, washed our hands, faces, cracked a few jokes and then using the heavy iron key chain which had multiple keys, opened the front door and we went in. He going to his seat, while I going to mine. As always, he’s fully absorbed, immersed in his work.

After waiting for half an hour to an hour, I announced that I’m going to take a leak and have water. He agreed to join me and we had a short break. After coming back, I sat a little across him and asked if I could ask him a few questions. Without missing a beat, he said sure. I asked him a few probing questions as to who he was, who else was in his family, what he used to do before enrolling here.

Slowly but surely, he teased out the answers sharing that while he had been a successful person and had money (he actually said ‘entrepreneur’ but my dream self couldn’t make out what it was) and while he had money saved, his wife was supporting him in this venture as she was good at Maths (a ‘statistician’ which again my dream self was oblivious was all about) and apart from learning about clothes, how they are made etc. something which he always enjoyed but which was discouraged in his house. They were working on a book about ‘learning outcomes’ (which again my dream self knew nothing about, but when he said he would be sharing stories about me and my class-mates I was excited and apprehensive at the same time.) He assured it would be nothing bad.

I asked him in my innocence as to why such a book was necessary because in my world-view we were doing nothing exciting about a school where most of us were learning in the hopes that with the skills we would somehow be able to eke out a living. Looking at the bleakness of the background of the people around me, I didn’t think there was anything worth writing about. I had learnt about writers who were given money to write about fairy tales and even had got a comic book or two with bright colors and pictures. When I asked him if it was going to be something similar to that book, he replied in the negative . He shared that they were in-fact were going to self-publish the book as the book was going to be ‘controversial’ in nature. While my dream self didn’t understand what ‘controversial was all about but was concerned when he explained that they would be putting up their own money to bring out the book. I felt this was foolishness as nobody I knew would spent money to print a book which didn’t have pictures and it was not also a fantasy like about a hero battling dragons and such.

At this moment, my dream ended. For those who had been working in the education sector I’m sure they would be having a laugh on almost all the aspects of the dream/story. ‘Learning outcomes’ has never been a serious consideration by either the Government of the day or previous Governments. Teachers are the most lowly paid staff in the Government machinery. Most of them who enter the profession, do it out of not being able to get a job any other way and are also not obsessed by the subject/s they teach. They somehow want to make ends meet. The less said of the ‘no detention’ policy of the Government, the better. Even the Government doesn’t believe the stats trouted by its own people but instead on ASER made by Pratham although the present Government has reversed it as it wants to show they have been doing the best job in field of education.

shirishag75 https://flossexperiences.wordpress.com #planet-debian – Experiences in the community

Frustrating spammers

Planet Debian - Pre, 16/11/2018 - 10:31pd

Sometimes tiny things make my day at 9am already.

That spammer got frustrated because none of his bots would get comments pasted to my blog:

Greetings to Cambodia.

BTW: Mikrotik RouterOS 6.41, CVE-2018-7445. RCE unpatched for 9+ months.

Daniel Lange https://daniel-lange.com/ Daniel Lange's blog

Robert Ancell: Counting Code in GNOME Settings

Planet Ubuntu - Enj, 15/11/2018 - 9:05md
I've been spending a bit of time recently working on GNOME Settings. One part of this has been bringing some of the older panel code up to modern standards, one of which is making use of GtkBuilder templates.
I wondered if any of these changes would show in the stats, so I wrote a program to analyse each branch in the git repository and break down the code between C and GtkBuilder. The results were graphed in Google Sheets:



This is just the user accounts panel, which shows some of the reduction in C code and increase in GtkBuilder data:


Here's the breakdown of which panels make up the codebase:



I don't think this draws any major conclusions, but is still interesting to see. Of note:
  • Some of the changes make in 3.28 did reduce the total amount of code! But it was quickly gobbled up by the new Thunderbolt panel.
  • Network and Printers are the dominant panels - look at all that code!
  • I ignored empty lines in the files in case differing coding styles would make some panels look bigger or smaller. It didn't seem to make a significant difference.
  • You can see a reduction in C code looking at individual panels that have been updated, but overall it gets lost in the total amount of code.
I'll have another look in a few cycles when more changes have landed (I'm working on a new sound panel at the moment).

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E36 – Thirty-Six Hours

Planet Ubuntu - Enj, 15/11/2018 - 4:00md

This week we’ve been resizing partitions. We interview Andrew Katz and discuss open souce and the law, bring you a command line love and go over all your feedback.

It’s Season 11 Episode 36 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

In this week’s show:

snap install hub hub ci-status hub issue hub pr hub sync hub pull-request
  • And we go over all your amazing feedback – thanks for sending it – please keep sending it!

  • Image credit: Greyson Joralemon

That’s all for this week! You can listen to the Ubuntu Podcast back catalogue on YouTube. If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2018

Planet Debian - Enj, 15/11/2018 - 3:36md

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In October, about 209 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

  • Abhijith PA did 1 hour (out of 10 hours allocated + 4 extra hours, thus keeping 13 extra hours for November).
  • Antoine Beaupré did 24 hours (out of 24 hours allocated).
  • Ben Hutchings did 19 hours (out of 15 hours allocated + 4 extra hours).
  • Chris Lamb did 18 hours (out of 18 hours allocated).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 12 hours (out of 30 hours allocated + 29.25 extra hours, thus keeping 47.25 extra hours for November).
  • Holger Levsen did 1 hour (out of 8 hours allocated + 19.5 extra hours, but he gave back the remaining hours due to his new role, see below).
  • Hugo Lefeuvre did 10 hours (out of 10 hours allocated).
  • Markus Koschany did 30 hours (out of 30 hours allocated).
  • Mike Gabriel did 4 hours (out of 8 hours allocated, thus keeping 4 extra hours for November).
  • Ola Lundqvist did 4 hours (out of 8 hours allocated + 8 extra hours, but gave back 4 hours, thus keeping 8 extra hours for November).
  • Roberto C. Sanchez did 15.5 hours (out of 18 hours allocated, thus keeping 2.5 extra hours for November).
  • Santiago Ruano Rincón did 10 hours (out of 28 extra hours, thus keeping 18 extra hours for November).
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 30 hours (out of 30 hours allocated).
Evolution of the situation

In November we are welcoming Brian May and Lucas Kanashiro back as contributors after they took some break from this work.

Holger Levsen is stepping down as LTS contributor but is taking over the role of LTS coordinator that was solely under the responsibility of Raphaël Hertzog up to now. Raphaël continues to handle the administrative side, but Holger will coordinate the LTS contributors ensuring that the work is done and that it is well done.

The number of sponsored hours increased to 212 hours per month, we gained a new sponsor (that shall not be named since they don’t want to be publicly listed).

The security tracker currently lists 27 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 27 packages needing an update.

Thanks to our sponsors

New sponsors are in bold.

No comment | Liked this article? Click here. | My blog is Flattr-enabled.

Raphaël Hertzog https://raphaelhertzog.com apt-get install debian-wizard

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2018

Planet Ubuntu - Enj, 15/11/2018 - 3:36md

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In October, about 209 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

  • Abhijith PA did 1 hour (out of 10 hours allocated + 4 extra hours, thus keeping 13 extra hours for November).
  • Antoine Beaupré did 24 hours (out of 24 hours allocated).
  • Ben Hutchings did 19 hours (out of 15 hours allocated + 4 extra hours).
  • Chris Lamb did 18 hours (out of 18 hours allocated).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 12 hours (out of 30 hours allocated + 29.25 extra hours, thus keeping 47.25 extra hours for November).
  • Holger Levsen did 1 hour (out of 8 hours allocated + 19.5 extra hours, but he gave back the remaining hours due to his new role, see below).
  • Hugo Lefeuvre did 10 hours (out of 10 hours allocated).
  • Markus Koschany did 30 hours (out of 30 hours allocated).
  • Mike Gabriel did 4 hours (out of 8 hours allocated, thus keeping 4 extra hours for November).
  • Ola Lundqvist did 4 hours (out of 8 hours allocated + 8 extra hours, but gave back 4 hours, thus keeping 8 extra hours for November).
  • Roberto C. Sanchez did 15.5 hours (out of 18 hours allocated, thus keeping 2.5 extra hours for November).
  • Santiago Ruano Rincón did 10 hours (out of 28 extra hours, thus keeping 18 extra hours for November).
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 30 hours (out of 30 hours allocated).
Evolution of the situation

In November we are welcoming Brian May and Lucas Kanashiro back as contributors after they took some break from this work.

Holger Levsen is stepping down as LTS contributor but is taking over the role of LTS coordinator that was solely under the responsibility of Raphaël Hertzog up to now. Raphaël continues to handle the administrative side, but Holger will coordinate the LTS contributors ensuring that the work is done and that it is well done.

The number of sponsored hours increased to 212 hours per month, we gained a new sponsor (that shall not be named since they don’t want to be publicly listed).

The security tracker currently lists 27 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 27 packages needing an update.

Thanks to our sponsors

New sponsors are in bold.

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docker and exec permissions

Planet Debian - Mër, 14/11/2018 - 11:53md
# docker version|grep Version Version: 18.03.1-ce Version: 18.03.1-ce # cat Dockerfile FROM alpine RUN addgroup service && adduser -S service -G service COPY --chown=root:root debug.sh /opt/debug.sh RUN chmod 544 /opt/debug.sh USER service ENTRYPOINT ["/opt/debug.sh"] # cat debug.sh #!/bin/sh ls -l /opt/debug.sh whoami # docker build -t foobar:latest .; docker run foobar Sending build context to Docker daemon 5.12kB [...] Sucessfully built 41c8b99a6371 Successfully tagged foobar:latest -r-xr--r-- 1 root root 37 Nov 14 22:42 /opt/debug.sh service # docker version|grep Version Version: 18.09.0 Version: 18.09.0 # docker run foobar standard_init_linux.go:190: exec user process caused "permission denied"

That changed with 18.06 and just uncovered some issues. I was, well let's say "surprised", that this ever worked at all. Other sets of perms like 0700 or 644 already failed with different error message on docker 18.03.1.

Sven Hoexter http://sven.stormbind.net/blog/ a blog

Visiting London

Planet Debian - Mër, 14/11/2018 - 2:42md

I'm visiting London the rest of the week (November 14th–18th) to watch match 5 and 6 of the Chess World Championship. If you're in the vicinity and want to say hi, drop me a note. :-)

Steinar H. Gunderson http://blog.sesse.net/ Steinar H. Gunderson

Alerts in Weblate to indicate problems with translations

Planet Debian - Mër, 14/11/2018 - 2:15md

Upcoming Weblate 3.3 will bring new feature called alerts. This is one place location where you will see problems in your translations. Right now it mostly covers Weblate integration issues, but it will be extended in the future for deeper translation wide diagnostics.

This will help users to better integrate Weblate into the development process giving integration hints or highlighting problems Weblate has found in the translation. It will identify typical problems like not merged git repositories, parse errors in files or duplicate translation files. You can read more on this feature in the Weblate documentation.

You can enjoy this feature on Hosted Weblate right now, it will be part of upcoming 3.3 release.

Filed under: Debian English SUSE Weblate

Michal Čihař https://blog.cihar.com/archives/debian/ Michal Čihař's Weblog, posts tagged by Debian

Tiago Carrondo: S01E10 – Tendência livre

Planet Ubuntu - Mër, 14/11/2018 - 3:02pd

Desta vez com um convidado, o Luís Costa, falámos muito sobre hardware, hardware livre e como não poderia deixar de ser: dos novos produtos da Libretrend, as novíssimas Librebox. Em mês de eventos a agenda teve um especial destaque com as actualizações disponíveis de todos os encontros e eventos anunciados! Já sabes: Ouve, subscreve e partilha!

Patrocínios

Este episódio foi produzido e editado por Alexandre Carrapiço (Thunderclaws Studios – captação, produção, edição, mistura e masterização de som) contacto: thunderclawstudiosPT–arroba–gmail.com.

Atribuição e licenças

A imagem de capa: richard ling em Visualhunt e está licenciada como CC BY-NC-ND.

A música do genérico é: “Won’t see it comin’ (Feat Aequality & N’sorte d’autruche)”, por Alpha Hydrae e está licenciada nos termos da CC0 1.0 Universal License.

Este episódio está licenciado nos termos da licença: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0), cujo texto integral pode ser lido aqui. Estamos abertos a licenciar para permitir outros tipos de utilização, contactem-nos para validação e autorização.

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